My Tottering TBR: Currently on My Night Table

Today in my importing I skip ahead a bit to introduce a new series rolled out recently and share once more while it is still current. 

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I know you all love books so here is another new series for your perusal. “My Tottering TBR” today will show off a few works my eyes are currently roving–that is, have actually started and are actively reading. Other angles will pop up as the series goes along and I hope you enjoy the titles.

(Blurbs are provided with links to other interesting stuff. Hyperlinked titles indicate an author or book’s direct page; others lead to related sites but I will always ensure there is an author link there.)

The World of Richard III by Kristie Dean

world of richard iiiRichard III remains one of the most controversial rulers in history. Whether he was guilty of murdering his nephews or not is a mystery that perhaps will never be solved. Even the location of the battlefield where, on 22 August 1485, Richard was struck down, has been a matter of debate. This book leads you on a journey through the landscape of Richard’s lifetime.

Following Richard’s trail, you will visit resplendent castles, towering cathedrals, manor homes and chapels associated with Richard. The Middle Ages come alive again as you visit Tewkesbury Abbey, where Richard helped his brother secure his throne. Witness the stunning vista of Wensleydale as you visit Middleham Castle, Richard’s adopted childhood home. Each location is brought to life through engaging narrative and an extensive collection of photographs, floor plans and images.

Added note: This book has since been read. To access the review click here.

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

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The year is 1945. Claire Randall, a former combat nurse, is just back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon as she walks through a standing stone in one of the ancient circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach–an “outlander”–in a Scotland torn by war and raiding border clans in the year of our Lord. . . 1743.

Hurled back in time by forces she cannot understand, Claire is catapulted into the intrigues of lairds and spies that may threaten her life, and shatter her heart. For here, James Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior, shows her a love so absolute that Claire becomes a woman torn between fidelity and desire–and between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives.

Sextant by David Barrie

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In the tradition of Dava Sobel’s Longitude comes this dramatic tale of invention and discovery–an eloquent elegy to one of the most important navigational instruments ever created, and to the daring mariners who used it to explore, conquer and map the world.

Barrie takes readers straight to the helm of some of history’s most important expeditions, interweaving these heroic tales with the account of his own transatlantic passage as a young man. A heady mix of adventure, science, mathematics, and derring-do, Sextant is infused with a sense of wonder and discovery. At once a dramatic history of maritime endeavor and a love letter to the sea and sky, it is timeless storytelling at its best.

Liberty’s First Crisis: Adams, Jefferson, and the Misfits Who Saved Free Speech by Charles Slack

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When the United States government passed the Bill of Rights in 1791, its uncompromising protection of speech and of the press were unlike anything the world had ever seen before. But by 1798, the once-dazzling young republic of the United States was on the verge of collapse: partisanship gripped the weak federal government, British seizures threatened American goods and men on the high seas, and war with France seemed imminent as its own democratic revolution deteriorated into terror. Suddenly, the First Amendment, which protected harsh commentary of the weak government, no longer seemed as practical. So that July, President John Adams and the Federalists in control of Congress passed an extreme piece of legislation that made criticism of the government and its leaders a crime punishable by heavy fines and jail time. In Liberty’s First Crisis, writer Charles Slack tells the story of the 1798 Sedition Act, the crucial moment when high ideals met real-world politics and the country’s future hung in the balance.

From a loudmouth in a bar to a firebrand politician to Benjamin Franklin’s own grandson, those victimized by the Sedition Act were as varied as the country’s citizenry. But Americans refused to let their freedoms be so easily dismissed: they penned fiery editorials, signed petitions and raised “liberty poles,” while Vice President Thomas Jefferson and James Madison drew up the infamous Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, arguing that the Federalist government had gone one step too far. Liberty’s First Crisis vividly unfolds these events in the early life of the republic, as the Founding Fathers struggled to define America off the page and preserve the freedoms they had fought so hard to create.

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I’d love to hear back from you on any of these or other titles you might recommend!

Note: This post recently appeared in the blog’s alternative location and has been updated since original publication to include a link to the review for The World of Richard III.

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Cover images courtesy their respective authors.

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