Browsing Books: Magical Magazine Edition

I used to love magazines. Only particular periodicals, of course, but love them nonetheless, for their gloss and thick, wonderful feel in my hands, a sensation that seemed to promise an equally fat chunk of time and pleasure in the perusal of their lovely images, thought-provoking articles, book recommendations, recipes, readings and snip-worthy portions, some of which, by the way, I retain from the collection of a teenage me.

hygge
Photo by and courtesy Alex Beauchamp. Click image for a lovely article about hygge.

As the years went by, however, I became less enamored of magazines, partly because more adult obligations entered my life and I simply lacked time. Though it is true, too, that the ads, which before I mostly skipped over save for their cut-and-pastability, grew old, and there were so many of them in the glossies I had once cherished. I suppose someone had to revenue the expensive articles, but paying the price for what nearly amounted to a book of advertisements was no longer charming. Moreover, as the letters from editors and articles became viciously politicized, I grew weary of expending so much mental energy working through words that demonized people such as myself—and via laundry lists of hate tellingly leaving out details that didn’t fit their apparent agendas. These reads no longer fed my soul, but rather sucked from me like a parasite, especially considering I was paying for them to do it.

This changed a couple of years ago when by chance I happened across a few magazines whose cover images communicated such feelings as “soulful inspiration” and “cozy retreat,” along with “creative simplicity” and “comforting beauty.” I was drawn to the special edition of one that spoke entirely about mindfulness, a sensible philosophy, oddly paired as that phrase may seem, that focuses on the moment. The many ideas wrapped themselves around me like a warm blanket because they were exactly what I needed in a life that had so much packed into it and demanded an amount of attention I could no longer give and remain healthy. Lovingly the words reached out to me, persuading that only one action should be something I do in that very moment: slow down.

Some readers here may remember the one that struck me from the start and that I haven’t let go of since: Flow. “A magazine for papers lovers,” it bills itself, and I am most definitely a paper fool. In the past couple of years I’ve seen a bit of an uptick in the magazine’s drive to increase reader consumerism with their spinoff products, something I really don’t need and work to avoid, but apart from that I love it as much as ever. The magazine sections, with several articles in each, include “Simplify Your Life,” “Feel Connected” and “Live Mindfully,” and every issue comes with a goodie or two for the paper geeks in us. This time it’s an herbarium booklet—perfect for walks during the oncoming spring/summer.

One article that appealed speaks of finding balance, another on the advantages of waiting (helpful for those mom-to-kid discussions on delayed gratification) and “The Fun of Watercoloring.” Interestingly, the piece’s blurb points to a thought I’d been forming just recently as I attempt to drive away anxiety about my own watercolors-to-be: that them coming out not as expected (or hoped) might actually be a great thing. And the pages smell wonderful. (Yes, I smell books.)

And books indeed are what these treasures really, when it comes down to it, are. I’d contemplated this before, but it was confirmed in my mind last night when I found a new title, Bella Grace. It’s hard to overemphasize how really thrilled I was to stumble upon this, which also happened accidentally. Typically on our visits to the bookstore my son and I gather a few items and head for the café. As usual I went for the periodical section for my favored titles, but didn’t see this one until I was putting the not-gets away! So just as accidentally as with Flow, I came across one containing a section—cited on the cover no less—called “Everyday Bits of Magic Worth Celebrating.” As I turned the card-stock quality paper, illustrated with photos as opposed to the drawings in many of the other new-style magazines, I breathed in the scent of the pages, marveled at the pieces’ titles and their wonderfully economic lengths that, for me, emphasize not “brief for those in a hurry” (although that may be part of the publishers’ rationale), but rather enables the flow of thought without overwhelmingly long articles, and gasped longingly at the prompts strategically positioned following sets.

There are entire pages with just one large photo and an inspirational quote that strikes me as words we really can be inspired by, as opposed to philosophical mantras that sound great but people often dismiss as so much else competes for their thought and time. I was so delighted at much of what I saw, including in “Sentiments” where readers write in, such as: “I stopped reading most mainstream magazines because I became disenchanted with the ads and constant advice. Your magazines are total immersion therapy for soulful art and inspiration.” That is the kind of thing I have been looking for for so long—soulfulness and inspiration, not badgering or condescension from those who care only about how much money they can wring from us. The publishers of these magazines have creatively tapped into what I believe many in our societies are feeling, and providing us with a return on the money we spend. Certainly they gain when we buy their products, but we benefit as well, whereas an expensive dress we saw in a fashion magazine can make us feel beautiful or happy for only a limited amount of time if that was the kind of thing we sought with its purchase.

Of course, you’ve heard this sort of thing before; so have I. Many of us have stopped buying, but still long for something we can’t always identify or define. Naturally, much of what we need and want grows internally and no purchase—even beautiful magazines—will put that there. It’s up to us to make the effort, but what I see here also is an exchange of ideas that can enable the internal growth of an intentional life, bringing a great deal more happiness and flowering of initiative and design.

Another thing I love about it—apart from the smell—is that there is absolutely no outside advertising, so the content remains timeless and you can pass it in its folding jacket cover to someone else as a small treasure. And while the magazine does have an online presence, the real content is in the book itself, accessible by getting off the Internet, reading and sharing.

One final note: Bella Grace’s “10 Easy Ways to Add Hygge to Your Life” defines the Danish word as “a general coziness as well as taking pleasure in simple moments.” Bella Grace thinks I know what this word already means, but I’d never heard of it until last night (despite my Danish Auntie Astrid, whose love certainly was hygge itself). Nevertheless, upon arriving home I practiced it most enthusiastically with a milk bath, climbing onto a yummy bed fluff with pillows, candles and the remaining scent of my blueberry soap as I settled into the magical, wonderful words and images that I am sure I shall muse more about at another time.

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Reading 2017: Origins of the Challenge

As many of you already know, I was never a diehard reading-by-the-numbers reader. Although some time ago I began recording my books in a wonderfully thick, green memoranda volume, later switching to an online database, it never occurred to me to count. I loved gazing at all the marvelous book covers, reminiscing about the stories and worlds I’d passed through. It also didn’t hurt that I could keep track of which books I owned, favorites and those I wished to read.

Until recently, though, it never occurred to me to put a number to them, and I admit at first it did strike me as an I-read-more-than-others type of exercise. At the start of 2016, however, when I noticed the Goodreads Reading Challenge, it also piqued my interest, perhaps owing to the gap in between my green-book recording and the recent years’ entries in another online library. I also contemplated that it might be a way to expand my horizons or hone my discipline (though I confess this latter element remained a vague goal).

And so it began with an aim of 50 books.

2016 book 1 of 3
A selection of books read in 2016, not in chronological order.

For much of the year I was ahead of the game, which I could see because of course the Goodreads algorithm notes how much you should be reading each day or week to keep up with your chosen number, and whether you are behind, on target or ahead of the game. As we got closer, perhaps a month or two before the end of the year, I reached my goal and increased it to 60. Other than for numbers, I’m unsure why I did this because, while achieving a goal is said to be such a great thing, this one really did very little for me except perhaps draw me into a competitive mindset I didn’t actually value and one that created a bit of stress.

Now, mind you, I don’t dislike competition in of itself but, having now experienced this reading challenge, it became clearer why this kind of contest doesn’t do much for me. What can I say I achieved by reading 60 books in one year? Bragging rights? The awareness within myself that I could do it? Without begrudging anyone else their goals, I simply didn’t really care all that much—it didn’t make me a more thoughtful reader because I did it faster, nor did I gain any real end aim for it all. I decided in 2017 I wouldn’t bother.

2016 2 of 3
A number of my 2016 reads will extend into 2017 by way of author interviews, musings, other works by the same authors and so on. The book missing its cover is called Growing Up in the Dark Ages (by Brenda Ralph Lewis).

I also left most of the groups I belonged to because I couldn’t keep up with the notifications, most of which I wasn’t interested in, anyway. Let me qualify that: I didn’t have the time to be interested in them. What I did see were considered notes to each other in groups that, had I more time, I would follow up on. Because I didn’t (and likely won’t for the foreseeable future), they began to clutter my mind rather than enrich it, so I had to sweep them off my plate.

And then one day I saw something that caught my eye—I no longer recall if this came from a group that invited me, or one I’d not yet left, or by some other path—and I was immediately interested. Actually I saw many somethings and ended up choosing one, possibly even tailored or trimmed to suit my needs better. It was a group having an ongoing discussion about a reading challenge and, at least in my memory as I sit here recalling it, there were dozens of options, none of which I’d ever considered! They involved getting serious with one’s to be read (TBR) list, step reading (i.e. one book from one genre or series, two from the next, three from the next and so on up to 15), re-reads, and all manner of challenges that I felt really fed the mind, rather than needlessly raced it. Unfortunately for me, I tend to get bogged down by the way all these notifications and messages back and forth in threads is set up, so I never ended up really contributing to the discussion, though I was encouraged and influenced by it.

2016 3 of 3
Click image to see books listed in order read and then individual covers for more details about particular works.

And so it is I decided to have at it for 2017, though in a different manner in which I approached last year, and that I’ll write about in our next installment of the Reading 2017 series. But let it not be said I got absolutely nothing out of 2016 reads–that would be categorically untrue. Of course, some I liked better than others, or perhaps it is more accurate to say they dug themselves deeper into my reader’s heart. Most were indie, many of which I wrote reviews for and which were part of different series (one, “950: 1066 Remembered,” still ongoing). Some, too, were traditionally published. A great number of them led me in other directions or linked to pathways I’d not yet traveled, or hadn’t in quite some time. Still others brought me to places and figures I found seemed already to be etched in my heart and our further travels together began.

And all that is the real victory.

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Click here for the first entry in our Reading 2017 series, where a fellow blogger and I talk about books and blogging. To see what I’m reading now (or at any given time), click here.

Book Review: The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

Note: Lars Hedbor will donate all proceeds for The Wind in the month of September 2017 to hurricane relief. Books are great for gifting, a weekend read or your favorite classroom. By purchasing in September, you will be positively touching the lives of those affected. Thank you so much!

Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida
The Wind
by Lars D.H. Hedbor

Click here for your free copy of The Declaration
(See below for upcoming author appearances)

The American Revolution being part of a larger world war is an idea that many people don’t touch upon, or disagree as to the accuracy of such an association. However, it remains true that many British saw our rebellion as part of French technique to run them down, and Spanish losses during the Seven Years’ War influenced their involvement against the British when the thirteen colonies declared their independence. Surely not forgetting the seizure of Havana, the Spaniards set themselves up to avoid a repeat, later aiming to re-take Florida, which had been divided by the British into east and west.

Thus it is in West Florida that Lars D.H. Hedbor sets The Wind, which opens with a dramatic hurricane scene that nevertheless has a feel of calm, as Gabriel falls from a noisy and chaotic sinking ship, into a quiet bliss, taking in the welcome stillness and warm water.

The whistling of the wind in the rigging, the desperate shouts of men struggling to make themselves heard over the storm, the crash of water against the sides of the ship, all were silenced. Gone, too, were the cracks and thuds of falling spars, the hoarse cries of surprise wrenched from the throats of men as they were swept from the decks, and the deep, muffled boom of the thunder.

 The passage has a peaceful effect on readers as well, and it is not difficult to imagine how someone might be lulled into the quiet arms of death by drowning. This introduces The Wind as perhaps the most intense and powerful installment in the Tales From a Revolution series I’ve read thus far, and that’s saying something, given Hedbor’s previously demonstrated and considerable skill in transporting readers to the moment, bringing events to vivid life and enabling an audience to see the era through the eyes of his characters, who are drawn with a deep understanding of the time and locales in which they live. Here the author goes one step further in portraying a Spaniard, as opposed to an American colonist, freshening up an already-lively series with a whole new, larger perspective.

The storm that washes Gabriel onto the shores where he meets Carlotta, preceded by Governor Galvez’s plan through covert operations to aid the American rebels, also brings a number of changes into the lives of the people in its midst. The bold plot is “swept aside now by the unpredictable power of the storm, a factor that [Gabriel] suspected was not doing as much harm to the plans of their enemies upriver.” As Gabriel recuperates in Carlotta’s ramshackle dwelling, she embarks on a search for her husband, Paulo.

As Hedbor moves his story along, his competency as a writer is easily apparent. Enabled by third-person narration, the author skillfully weaves in and out of Gabriel’s point of view and his observations of Carlotta’s emotional state. Shortly after awakening the subsequent morning, “[h]is expression formed the question that she answered with a slow, sad shake of her head.” Following a few words, she “punctuates her conclusion with a deep sigh” and after a quiet conversation, her shoulders shake “with the unrelenting sobs of the bereaved.” The intervening dialogue strikes a balance in their exchange, and the tale has established itself as readers eagerly anticipate learning the fate of Paulo as well as what Gabriel plans for his future.

As the narrative continues and Gabriel’s fate opens before him, Hedbor adds more plotlines, to include murder, siege, betrayal, shipboard battle—and a foray into magical realism. The protagonist feels obligations toward the villagers, but yearns for his sailing life as he strains to cope with the growing conflicts, personal and political.

“It is a matter of our honor and our duties as subjects of King Carlos of Bourbon, in Madrid … [h]e says to fight in his name, and we can do no other.”

 Still she scowled at Gabriel, answering, “The King is not living in a hut far from his real home, counting his blessings for every potato that some far-off benefactor deigns to send him …. You ask whether our progress here satisfies me, without ever asking me once whether the goal you work toward is anything that I want. Perhaps I was not interested in re-building these shacks, and waiting for the next storm to blow them into splinters.”

 That Hedbor so succinctly and brilliantly speaks from such a wide variety of perspectives, whether within one novel and the opposing ideals of two or more characters, or when examining his other works in which he presents stories from such a diverse sampling of colonists who lived over 200 years before—this is nothing short of awe inspiring. His dialogue and its attendant character gesticulations and facial movements, depicted or observed, the narrative that flows so smoothly, contains such a trove of experience and understanding; it moves with fluidity and grace, despite the great import of its prose and importance within. We take in an entire world with the expenditure of only a few words. This is carefully crafted art, consummate storytelling, and while Hedbor’s previous novels* are radiant, The Wind champions what people have been doing for thousands of years, and fulfills the inbuilt human yearning to be told a story.

As we move closer to the Spanish attempts to wrest back from the British what was taken and divided, we encounter yet more storms, the wind of which carries in what seems like certain fate (see derived hurricane tracks here). Galvez’s forces take their aim at the Siege of Pensacola, the portrayals of which are perhaps the most skillfully executed in the entire novel. Whether inevitable defeat etched out in the scenes sailors witness, anger, upswept optimism or the burden of silent losses, readers are carried on and feel each wave as the pages turn, sense the rise and fall of fortune like the ebb and flow of the sea, smell the salt air that inspires and the longing of separation.

That Gabriel becomes part of a tale for our ears and eyes might be gratifying for him, given that his role—fictional here, though representative of many whose journeys crossed the routes described herein—floundered for quite some time, away from the imagination of the American reader. His aim for a comeback quenches American taste for revivals, and in our quest along with him to attain it, we encounter a story so rich and thrilling, readers will wonder exactly why this account is not more widely known. Thanks to Lars Hedbor, it soon will be, on our own shores and elsewhere.


* Thus far The Prize, The Light and The Smoke.

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Lars D. H. Hedbor tells a little about himself and how his novels came to be…

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and will be a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

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You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Wind may be purchased in paperback (signed copies available upon request), as Kindle, Nook, iBooks, Kobo or at Smashwords. (Paperbacks also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble links.)

UPCOMING APPEARANCES

When: Sunday June 4 (1:30-5:00 p.m.): Wilsonville Festival of Arts
Where: 29600 SW Park Place, Wilsonville, OR
The annual Wilsonville Festival of Arts is the Wilsonville Arts & Culture Council signature event. Lars will be meeting with readers and signing books all afternoon.

When: Saturday June 24 (3:45- 5:15 p.m.)
Where: Hilton Portland, 921 SW 6th Avenue, Portland, OR
Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference Book SigningThe premiere event for historical fiction in North America, the 2017 HNS Conference is being held in Portland, Oregon. Meet Lars and get your books signed during the book sale at the conference!

When: Friday June 23 (10:30- 11:30 a.m.)
Where: Hilton Portland, 921 SW 6th Avenue, Portland, OR
HNS 2017 Imagining the American Revolutionary Era Panel
[Lars D.H. Hedbor, C.C. Humphreys, Laura Kamoie, Stephanie Dray; moderator: Matt Phillips]
Between Outlander, Turn, and Hamilton: The Musical, the American revolutionary era has gained renewed public interest and attention. Join authors established in this era in a discussion of trends and opportunities in American revolutionary fiction, research challenges and advantages, topics and figures ripe for fictionalized treatment, how to incorporate historical sites into your research and promotion, and more.

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Photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

A copy of The Wind was furnished to the blogger in exchange for an honest review.

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Update: A note was added to include information about author contributions from sales to hurricane relief.

Book Review: Community 17

Community 17: A Dystopian Novella
by James Cardona

A Gold Medal Winner of the Wishing Shelf Book Awards
Recipient of the B.R.A.G. Medallion
Reader Views Literary Award Winner

James Cardona’s Community 17 is the dystopian story of a young boy, Isaias, living in the slum segment of a society governed by watchers who enforce their rule on inhabitants by way of constant surveillance and interference. Government mandates include video diaries they are required to keep, recording daily activities and thoughts on such; school attendance referred to as “programming” and other children “program-mates”; and received social mores that frown upon emotion and open communication. Therefore, negative attention might be attracted not only when someone says or does something out of line, but also when failing to exhibit the appropriate amount of enthusiasm for the dictated status quo.

Within this society exist plebs— Isaias’s marginalized group— free thinkers and citizens, this last status of which it is said might be obtained if someone can pass all their tests. Isaias and Jessia secretly plan to make their way to the citizens’ side even though no one who has ever crossed over has been heard from again. Free thinkers position themselves as those who secretly work to loosen the stranglehold the Agency holds on the plebs. However, within this remains the possibility that Isaias and Jessia will be separated.

commThe novel opens with a suicide bombing, the technique later dismissed, unsurprisingly, by a supporting character: “Paradise. Another one of the free thinkers’ empty promises. If you do their work for them, your family will go to paradise.” These are the bitter words describing the free thinkers, known but not necessarily admired by the entire pleb segment of the population, even if they mutually loathe the Agency, who dictate their lives. Reflecting elements of some insidious governing groups operating in our own real world, readers easily recognize the plebs’ double oppression for what it is, with freebies thrown in to soften or erase the hand of tyranny and hierarchical division manipulated upon the masses.

Cardona cleverly, selectively separates or mingles details of and Isaias’s experiences with free thinkers and the Agency—the group in charge of the bomb investigation—to mirror what the experience must be like for those in his position: thought control that works not only with the ongoing surveillance, but also in creating a sense of self doubt that stalls the taking of action, and who operates behind this subversive atmosphere remains a question until the very end.

The author also holds the reader in thrall with this deliberate introduction of atrocious policies and acts, exposing what is behind the curtain only when he is sure we have digested and moved on from the previous astonishing revelation. This, too, is reflective: It has been said that people will participate in their own oppression if the methods to bind them are introduced slowly and over time. Cardona’s understanding of and presentation in this cautionary tale has a two-pronged fear factor: it is all too frighteningly extreme to be real, yet it is so realistic it should terrify anyone consenting to sign their own agency over to anyone with the means to control it.

Having said that, it should also be noted that Cardona doesn’t come out and say any of this and, in fact, neither do his characters most of the time. Their speech is so stifled that even their own thoughts frighten them.


I guess what bothers me the most is being in the dark and hearing the rats around me. Everyone was used to the rats in Community 17. The garbage attracts them. Who hadn’t woken in the morning to find new rat bites somewhere on their skin? But here, in the dark, in this hole where there is no escape? There’s something terrible about listening to their little feet scurrying toward us … I feel like I’m becoming one of them.

 He flinched at the last line, wondering where it had come from. That wasn’t in my head, was it?


Without needing to engage in any manner of preaching, Cardona gives us a disturbingly clear and close-up view to the life of someone whose community is referred to by a number. That Isaias’s character might have been a bit more developed could be related to this, as his community’s overlords prefer to perceive him as a being labeled by a bio-identifier.

As a young adult novel, Community 17 lives up to its storytelling task: engrossing and thrilling, with conflict many teens would have some familiarity with in today’s world, it carries the reader through its scenes and events with language appropriate for teen readers, yet also satisfying for the adult literary palate. The dialogue shows young adults in moments of confusion as well as making some astute observations, all of them very realistic, leading me to marvel at Cardona’s people watching-skills. He has his finger on the pulse of today’s teens, shrewdly observing their interactions with society and how society responds to them.

While Cardona’s writing is concise, well-paced and complex in its plot, he takes the tale one step further by introducing every chapter with several lines of verse, each grouping strong enough to stand on its own. Alternately, they could be read as one storyline that loosely follows Isaias’s journeys, while also running, thread-like, through the novel and providing thoughts, images and phrases reminiscent of biblical accounts of questions and revelations. By virtue of the repetition of such imagery as rocks, water and pools, we call up such writings as Isaiah, who speaks of “a sure foundation” (28:16) and “water [that] shall burst forth in the wilderness” (35:6), water called forth from rocks for Israel, who doubted the veracity of God’s word.

As Isaias, too, hears “truth” from those who position themselves as all-knowing, creating uncertainty as to who he can really believe and what their motives are, he progresses through literal and figurative tunnels, growing more ill as each day goes by, certain he will be captured at any moment.

Only there is shadow under this red rock.

Come in under the shadow of this red rock,

And I will show you something

Different from either

Your shadow at morning standing behind you

Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;

I will show you fear in a handful of dust.

Here is poetry that stirs the soul, drawing one’s mind into it as we search, as Isaias searches, seeking a cure for this afflicted community, Isaias’s sickness, to find Bethesda, “a pool among the rock,” the waters of which would wash away all that ails such a society and its inhabitants, who currently survive on the navigational skills that lead them through a labyrinth of duplicity.

As the novel leads readers to its dramatic conclusion, questions still remain, and Cardona gives the sense Isaias knows more than he lets on to those around him as well as readers, and the author pulls off this withholding impeccably. As elusive as the truth its characters seek, Community 17 is the book one tries to read in one sitting, that they take with them when leaving the house: its layers are probing, addicting, spiced with mystery, deceit, loyalty, romance and backstabbing. It is compelling, with a silence that will follow the end as readers quietly close the book and contemplate its effect.

About the author …

banner1_960x230James Cardona is an award winning author who has written multiple science fiction and fantasy books along with a spate of nonfiction works to boot. He has won the gold medal in the Teenager Category of the Wishing Shelf Book awards, taken Honorable Mention in the Teenager Category at Reader Views Literary Awards and was an Indie BRAG winner, all for Community 17. His children’s book, Santa Claus vs. the Aliens, was a finalist of the Wishing Shelf Book awards in addition to being an Indie BRAG winner. His fantasy book, Under The Shadow Of Darkness, was also a finalist of the Wishing Shelf Book awards.

James was born in Lorain, Ohio, and received his Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Delaware with a minor in Religious Studies. He also studied briefly at Penn State University. He spent six years in the U.S. Navy and served during the first Gulf War. He has worked in factories and food service, as an electrician, a teacher, supervisor and engineer. But like many creatives, his heart beats most strongly when it is full of the magic of building something new. Besides writing, he can be found drawing, painting, writing computer code, tinkering with electronics and building robots. Prior to his knees turning creaky he was an avid runner, completing about fifty or so races at the half marathon distance or greater.

jimmy-navy-1989-350x
EM3 James Cardona

His debut novel was Gabriella and Dr. Duggan’s Dimensional Transport Machine, the first book in the NuGen series. In 2013, he wrote the children’s science fiction-holiday book Santa Claus vs. The Aliens, followed by first in The Apprentice fantasy series, Under the Shadow of Darkness. In 2015, he penned three new books. Gabriella and the Curse of the Black Spot, second in the NuGen series and The Dragon’s Castle, second in The Apprentice series. Finally, in 2015 he wrote something completely different, Community 17, a whirlwind, dystopian science-fiction adventure. In 2016, James released Dragon Hunters, a science fiction-fantasy mashup of a story, and The Night Wolf, a prelude tale set in the world of the apprentice series.

He is currently working on The Worthy Apprentice and Into Darkness, which are parts three and four of The Apprentice series respectively. He is also writing something fresh and new, a science fiction book tentatively titled Rebirth.

To see much more about the multi-award winning author James Cardona, including more biographical information and history, see his fun, informative and intriguing website. You can also follow him at Goodreads and find his books at Amazon and Amazon UK.

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Photos courtesy James Cardona

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A free copy of Community 17: A Dystopian Novella was provided in order to facilitate an honest review. 

 

Book Review: Fortune’s Whelp

Fortune’s Whelp by Benerson Little

“The rencontre took place early in the evening under a storm-darkening sky, with just enough daylight remaining to preclude the accidents that plague swordplay at dusk and in darkness. The wind had risen, bringing with it the chill of river and sea; this, along with the approaching sunset, and the location on the outskirts of the city, kept witnesses where they belong, that is to say, away.”

 So starts Benerson Little’s debut work of fiction, Fortune’s Whelp, in smooth follow-up to the pirate historian’s previous works of non-fiction. Enclosed by approaching night in a violent scenario, Scotsman Edward MacNaughton plunges fast forward through land and sea adventure and into discovery of an attempt to assassinate King William III. As the Jacobite plot’s date draws nearer, MacNaughton must identify who around him conspires for their own ends or toward political gain, willing to take him down in the process—and this includes the women he finds himself involved with.

fortuneFrom the opening scene through to the conclusion of Fortune’s Whelp, Little’s narrative wraps itself around us as we are glued to the edges of our seats—miss our bus stops, lose track of bedtime, leave dinner to burn—with a tension so thick it preoccupies us even after the fearsome moments have passed.

Perhaps it is MacNaughton’s magnetic draw of intrigue, or the historical details, mundane and enthralling alike, that Little weaves through his tale—the elements of reality that haunt the reading and our tendency to read rapidly, as if fast-flipping pages might get our protagonist more swiftly away from those who track him—that amp up the tension and render this novel one not easily surrendered to the tasks of daily life. This anxiety-provoking is exacerbated by Edward himself, who frequently confirms reader suspicion with acknowledgements of perilous moments, such as when he “sensed dangerous eyes upon him.”

MacNaughton is written as a hybrid of questionable romantic hero and admirably devilish villain, and he does indeed doubt or reprimand himself as he moves about in his world as described by his creator in a fashion that brings us as close as we could get to it: this age is described so in detail, though without relying on detail description. Instead, elements stitch themselves in and around all aspects of MacNaughton’s movements, from an appearance of Spanish brandy to his mockery of a naval officer (“doubtless your mother paid for your commission”) and his progression-via-instinct through a series of streets and alleys when attempting to find while simultaneously avoid an enemy. We are given glimpses and understanding as to how the era operates, with a toss of humor here and there, for relief as well as to show another side of the time.

“I’ve seen that bugger around here before; he talks a lot but won’t pay for anything.”

 Edward gave the woman the coin. His reason suggested this was part of a trap; his instinct considered it unlikely. In either case, he was on his guard against two potential enemies.

 “Come with me.”

 “Why?”

 “You’ve just tipped me the wink, and I’ve paid, haven’t I? To Walter Lane, then to a place we’ll be safe from his eyes.”

 “If you want to dock, it’ll cost you more.”

 “Pardon me, mistress, but you’re pricing your wares a bit high, aren’t you?”

 “I’m worth every penny and shilling of a guinea,” she replied indignantly.

 “I believe you,” Edward said sincerely.

 Little’s narrative is written at such a pace that we seem at times to make haste along with MacNaughton, with a smoothness that carries us along, always wanting to keep going. Transitions are seamless and one scrape or another all are linked by events and associations, so we clearly see the story is much more than a series of adventures in the life of any man: MacNaughton has goals in mind, if only he can safely make his way to them before plots and pitfalls find him first.

MacNaughton is his own man though he is also, as the novel’s title indicates, fortune’s whelp. Bred on adventure and fed with swashbuckling plot twists, our protagonist frequently courts fate even as he faces down his enemies, be they actual persons or probing anxiety in a darkened alley. Daring, energetic and skilled, he is nevertheless written with flaws that could easily brand him as real as the historical figures who make appearances in Fortune’s Whelp.

Any reviewer would be remiss to ignore the fight scenes in this novel: thrilling and of the nail-biting variety because we know MacNaughton isn’t an always-victorious two-dimensional character, Little sets them up so expertly that upon commencement we hear the clash of weapons, smell the salt in the air, gain our footing as we establish purchase within the skirmish, right along with the characters.

Edward watched him warily; the man was surely full of tricks. He might pull a pistol, hurl dirt or snuff in his eyes, or dart his sword at him.

 “Behind you, sir! The watch!” the man shouted at Edward.

 Edward turned his head just enough to draw the man’s attack, then, as it was dark and difficult to follow a blade with the eyes, made a round parry, found the blade, and thrust swiftly. Sensing his adversary’s counter-parry, he turned his sword hand up, allow it angulate around his adversary’s parry, and, covering with his left hand as he thrust, hit his adversary just below the right collarbone.”

 The author not only provides explanations for those unfamiliar with sword fighting terminology, but also does it in a manner in which readers can choose for themselves how often to stem the flow of reading to refer to the notes, or not to at all. Following his conclusion, Little adds several sets of notes, including those on swordplay with an alphabetical listing of particular terms and their meanings (separate from the glossary, which cuts down on all-over-the-map searches). It is great fun to act out the fights, even at a slower pace, to have a greater appreciation of what MacNaughton is up against.

Many books, perhaps even most, reveal to readers more information upon subsequent reads and re-reads, and it is rewarding when we realize these small surprises. Fortune’s Whelp is one in which readers finish, close the book and know ahead of time this is in store for them. With so much history written within a novel of intrigue, and daring revealed within the history, there is an instinctive understanding that this is a book to re-read, and this reviewer answered that summons—interestingly enough even though Jacobite plotting and seventeenth-century history isn’t generally where my interests reside.

For those who love a great tale, written with engaging and realistic characters who call you to their side, for seafaring types and landlubbers alike, Fortune’s Whelp is a compelling and captivating novel whose fate it is to draw readers over and over again.

About the author …

Born in Key West, Florida, Benerson Little grew up variously on all three US coasts. Following his graduation from Tulane University, he entered the US Navy and served as an officer for eight years, most of them as a Navy SEAL. Upon completion of Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training in 1983 (BUD/S Class 121), he was assigned first to SEAL Team THREE, then to SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE. After leaving the Navy in 1989, he worked as a special operations and intelligence analyst, including for the Naval Special Warfare Strategy and Tactics Group and for a private intelligence collection and analysis firm, among other professions.

He now works as a writer and consultant in several areas, with an emphasis on maritime and naval issues, including maritime threat and security, and especially maritime history. He is considered a leading expert on piracy past and present, and is a recognized expert on pirate tactics and anti-piracy operations throughout history. He has appeared in two television documentaries on piracy, has advised on others, and is the STARZ premium cable network’s historical consultant for its Black Sails series, currently filming its third season. He often advises film-makers, novelists, historians, biographers, genealogists, treasure hunters, journalists, and others.

You can learn more about author Benerson Little’s books, news, writing and more at his informative and fascinating website, Facebook, Twitter and his blog.

Author photo courtesy Benerson Little.

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A copy of Fortune’s Whelp was provided to the blogger in order to produce an honest review.

950: 1066 Remembered, Interview: Paula Lofting (B.R.A.G. Medallion Winner)

Today we are joined by author Paula Lofting, whose debut work, Sons of the Wolf, recipient of the B.R.A.G. Medallion, is a fantastic introduction to 1066 for those unfamiliar with the year or its significance. Those more schooled in this era will see in the novel as well a story that brings to life the people and proceedings of the time in a manner that revitalizes one’s appreciation for what led to these events, and the individual experiences of those who lived them.

Award-winning debut work Sons of the Wolf (Click image for review)

Starting in September of 2016 we began a journey through memories via reviews, poetry, interviews, excerpts, even visiting with a real historical character and more. As the year drew to a close our focus pulled back and we began, much like those whose lives and changes we remember, to carry on, as it were, take in other elements of life and move forward. But they never leave our awareness, these people and events, and for many something akin to a scar in the soul remains.

Very much like our forebears, we need to make sense of the pain and what has happened, often without much of the necessary information, so we gather what we have and tell. We fill in gaps to the best of our abilities, with imagination and understanding of evidence as well as realities of the world, and pass it all on to the next generation. This is as our ancestors themselves would have done; what is different now is that it typically is transferred to media in the form of books, plays, movies, art and song–and by the many rather than the few commissioned individuals.

Paula Lofting continues this tradition, today sharing with us details about what led her to this path, educated guesses regarding missing details, and her role in carrying on the tradition of telling.

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Hello, Paula Lofting, and good day!

Hi, Lisl, thanks for having me on your fabulous blog.

Oh, it’s fantastic to see you here! So far you have published the award-winning Sons of the Wolf and then The Wolf Banner, with a third in the works. Could you tell our readers a bit about your first two novels?

Click image for my review of Lofting’s exciting sequel to Sons of the Wolf, The Wolf Banner

Ok, so Sons of the Wolf is a series, which starts with the book of its name. I got the inspiration for Sons after reading a book by David Howarth called 1066: The Year of the Conquest. Mr. Howarth told us a story through the eyes of his own village, as it occurred 1,000 years ago. It follows the fortunes of a thegn, Wulfhere, who Howarth mentions in his book as having been the landowner back then. He owned this little village called Horstede (now called Little Horsted) and surrounding land, and owed service to the king for it.

Through Howarth’s descriptions of daily life in an 11th century homestead, I conjured up a story in my head, and just had to get it onto paper! Book I of Sons of the Wolf starts when the thegn is returning home from a battle in Scotland with his fyrdsman, and the reader is introduced to his family, of which there are plenty. We also see historical characters: Harold Godwinson and his brothers, King Edward the Confessor and Harold’s sister Edith, the queen, plus the very lovely Edith Swanneck. The premise of the book is to show the events that eventually lead to the Battle of Hastings, so there is conflict, as well as love, betrayal and a bloodfeud involved.

In the second book, The Wolf Banner, we have three threads emerging. The main one follows Wulfhere and his brood as their lives are very much changed by the bloodfeud that impinges it. We have Earl Harold, who is basically running the country for the king by now, and we see the torment he suffers in not being able to help his younger sibling and nephew, both of whom are held hostage by the duke of Normandy. The reasons being, that if Harold was to demand their release, it would open a whole jar of worms that would spell danger for England.

The third thread belongs to a character called Burghred, who was supposed to be only a minor character from the first book, but refused to be held back and stole a storyline for himself.

Sons of the Wolf starts in 1054 and by the end of The Wolf Banner, we are in 1059. The next book, Wolf’s Bane, will cover the years from 1059-63 or 64, I’m not sure yet.

Did publishing your first book tweak your process of writing? Did you make any changes to how you set about doing things?

I can’t really answer this [laughs]. I don’t have a clue.

You’ve spoken of wanting to write a book since you were a small girl. What was an early experience in which you learned that language had power?

I think perhaps in primary school. I always felt like I was not one of the in-crowd, was never chosen for anything. I wasn’t a poor student, but I wasn’t an exceptional student. I felt like a nonentity until I really got into composition lessons. Here I found my forte and the teacher would read them out, give me top marks and always complemented my writing.

Secondly, I realised in my own childish way, the power of language when I found myself spending hours at the library looking at the books and spending the whole weekend wrapped in a book—and when I say ‘in a book,’ I mean I was there, inside it. Nothing had ever excited or drawn me in like a book. Language has the power to provide an escape route, somewhere to go to when the world is all too much. Now, as I write, that power has taken it to another level.

Your bio includes mention of a few authors who influenced your imagination. Did any of their works lead you to pre-1066 as the era you wanted to write about? Had you already chosen before you came across the real Wulfhere?

Not entirely sure, possibly Rosemary Sutcliffe; however, her books are mostly post Roman, early Romano Celt. But probably there is some influence there. I remember reading the fabulous Hope Muntz story of The Golden Warrior and being immersed in that as a teenager. I’m sure that I was very much taken by Michael Wood in the early 80s; his TV programme In Search of the Dark Ages was very influential.

I also remember my father teaching me about kings and queens and going through the Anglo-Saxon ones, too. But a lot of this became consigned to the corners of my memories as my life progressed and this era wasn’t reawakened in me until my early forties, when I found myself at a Hastings reenactment and suddenly the switch went on again. Ever since, I’ve immersed myself in Harold’s story and the events of that time. I’ve found it’s almost as if I was there, or one of my ancestors was and that it could be in my DNA, as someone suggested.

How did/do you research your main character and his era?

Fortunately, there was not much to know about Wulfhere; what is recorded is just his property and land holding, and his name. I would have loved to have known more about him, but at least the not knowing means I can have free reign with him.

Now what I do have to research (it’s an ongoing task) are the events of the time, so that means I need books, as many as I can get my hands on, primary and secondary sources. It’s very important to try and get as many primary sources as possible, because there is not a lot of written work available for this period, and so one must gather what one can.

Thirdly, I have always had a strong belief that to write good historical fiction, one needs to be able to create the world as close as possible. I didn’t want to make anachronistic mistakes in regards to housing, diet and clothing, or place chimneys in stone houses when they had hearths in the middle of the floor in halls made from timber or wattle and daub. And so I joined a living history group and I think that I have a good handle on how people lived in the 11th century, and even know what it’s like to be faced with a screaming enemy running towards you as you stand in a shieldwall, shoulder to shoulder. I’ve fought with a spear and tried my hand at a sword, so I have some idea of what it was like. The best thing is being killed, sliced to death with a sword or an axe, and being able to live to tell the tale.

Do you feel you owe anything to the real people upon whom you base your characters? If so, what? If you were—whether through time travel or some other method—to meet Wulfhere of Horstede, what would you say to him? What do you think he might say to or ask of you?

In answer to your first question, I believe it’s important to get the facts as right as is possible. I wouldn’t take liberties like others have done with real characters’ lives. For example, I read a book about Hereward, where Harold’s character (a nasty black-guard) kills Edward the Confessor by smothering him on his deathbed. There was no author’s note to explain, and there is no evidence to say that he did this. It’s one thing to believe something has happened, but to defame someone’s character by accusing them of a murder there is no evidence for, is not on, in my honest opinion.

So, in looking at the sources regarding the characters in my book, I hope to have come up with a fair account of their characters. To do this I look at what were their deeds, what do the sources say about them as people and so on. In this period there isn’t a lot, but what has been written about Harold does not equate to a murdering evil git. That’s not to say he was perfect. No one is. So you have to try and get a balance when writing about a factual person. Most good people are known to do bad things once in a while and most bad people are known to have done good things once in a while.

With Wulfhere and his arch enemy, Helghi of Gorde, they are just names in the sources, so I have little to go on, but for the sake of the story I feel I can take liberties because they are only footnotes in history. And if I were to go back in time and speak with my Wulfhere, I would probably give him no end of a hard time for all the silly stupid scrapes he gets himself into. He would probably tell me it was my fault anyway, for writing the script.

What’s the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex? Was there any scene in particular that was most difficult to write?

I don’t think I have too much of a problem writing about men. I haven’t come across anything yet where I might have had to consult a guy to find out how a man might react in a certain situation. Maybe I’m just in tune with my masculine side.

Bayeux Tapestry, Scene 4: Here Harold sails on the sea (by image on web site of Ulrich Harsh [public domain], via Wikimedia Commons). Click image and scroll to see something amazing!
As a fan of your Sons of the Wolf series, I’ve grown attached to Wulfhere and his family, and your narrative has taken us readers through their loves, losses, victories and so on. As we get closer to 1066, can you tell us anything that might be upcoming?

Cripes, how do I answer this without giving out spoilers? Hmm. Ok, let’s summarise what I have in my head:

  • Someone will fall in love with someone whose station is too far above them
  • Someone else will fall in love with the wife of someone else
  • There will be more conflict between the two families of Horstede and Gorde
  • There’s bound to be a death or two
  • Harold gets a new companion in his houseguard
  • There is a rocky road ahead for one young couple
  • And someone has a nervous breakdown

Do you have an idea how many installments you might end up with in the Sons of the Wolf series? Or is that already mapped out?

I have no idea but I can say that there could be seven altogether. I just hope that I can think of more titles with Wolf in them.

Will Harold feature more prominently in the novels as we move toward that fateful year?

Yes, he definitely will. His story must be told and he basically is 1066 personified.

What do you believe were Harold Godwinson’s strongest character traits and weakest flaws? Were these the result of individual MO or more aligned to standards of the time?

Until post-Conquest, you will not find much in the way of anything bad written about Harold. This could be because his family had so much influence in the country. I think probably his strongest trait was his skill in diplomacy. He handled two incursions by the Welsh king and his English ally, Alfgar, without causing a war and would rather use diplomacy than get heavy and call for battle. However, his reluctance to invoke a civil war on behalf of his brother, Tostig, was for the wider good of the kingdom. Paradoxically, it was to play a part in his downfall. Alienating his own brother was not good for Harold.

Probably the worst thing Harold ever did was lay waste to Wales in 1063. But Harold could not have been expected to do anything else, really. The Welsh king had been a pain in the butt for too long and now with his ally, Alfgar, dead, Harold waived his diplomatic side and stormed into Wales to devastate it. Thus, Gruffudd lost his head, and Harold gained a new wife. And this laying lands to waste was not uncommon in medieval times, but given the fact that Harold had restrained his hand on a number of occasions, I think he was less of a war monger than some other kings of the period.

If you had the power to change any historical events, such as who won at Hastings, would you? Why or why not?

I would love to be able to change this, but actually, I’m glad that I can’t. Mainly because I think that it ended how it was supposed to end. If that day had ended any differently, all of history would be changed. I’m not sure that would be a good thing. Things might have turned out worse for the world, not that it could get much worse….

As it is, Harold has left his mark in history as the ‘good guy’ and William left his mainly as the bad guy who committed atrocities against the English. If he were alive today he would have been a war criminal.

That’s important to point out. What did you feel or think when you first began to learn about 1066, and how might you have grown to feel about it, or perceive it over time?

I didn’t realise that I would be so obsessed by it. There is something about this era that really gets to me. It started out as an interest and now I live, eat, and breathe it. I was talking to Helen Hollick last year at the Historical Novel Society conference and she mentioned that she believes it could be in her DNA, that perhaps the emotion she feels around what happened on that day is embedded in her blood, passed down to her by an ancestor who was there. It kind of makes sense. Perhaps that is the only way to explain the deep, intense passion I feel every time I read about it, or learn more about it.

I must say, it’s really hard not to dislike William of Normandy, even though I have tried to be objective about the events of that year. But when I looked into the Harrowing of the North, which he caused, and in which tens of thousands were said to have perished as a direct consequence and following the devastation, I decided to let go and accept that actually, I cannot be objective about something so heinous, and it was thought of as such by his contemporaries. I’m not saying that Harold was the perfect king and a saint, but William seems to have been so authoritarian and devoid of all conscience. It was not a good time to be English and one of the lower classes.

What would you say to people who either express no interest in who won the Battle of Hastings, or those who side with William?

Read Marc Morris’ brilliant and objective account, The Norman Conquest. It gives factual evidence of his brutality without taking sides. He also points out that the English nobility could be just as brutal towards each other (bloodfeuds were rife in England at that time, especially in the north), and that the Normans rarely killed another noble. However, William didn’t mind maiming and destroying the lives of lesser men.

The other thing I would say is, the Witan chose Harold, ok there was no doubt some manipulation going on there, but if I had been around at the time, there’s no way I would want the untried boy, Edgar, inexperienced as he was, on the throne. Nor would I want William of Normandy ruling my country, giving land to his friends, and disinheriting my fellow countrymen. I would want a tough Englishman to fight for me and my rights, and at that time, Harold was the man.

William had no blood link to the throne. Nor apparently, did Harold; however, having no blood link and being English was better than having no blood link and no ties to England. Harold had spent four months with the guy in Normandy and only escaped with his life when he was forced to promise on oath to serve William as his vassal. He knew the damage William could inflict. And that’s one reason he wanted to be king, I believe. The evidence is there. William was not good for England or Englishmen.

Do you think there could have been any way William might have been less cruel to the English people? Was it his upbringing that played a role in his treatment of the conquered?

William did have a terrible childhood. He suffered many traumas, his father died, his life was in danger, his guardian was killed whilst he was asleep in the same room. He was forced to hide amongst peasants when his life was in danger. And then later, there were those who would force him out of his duchy if they could. So yes, it must have affected him. I think the experiences that William had in his youth played a profound part in his psyche and his behavior towards those who would oppose him. He had to be tough. And tough, he was. These are the reasons why he was like he was, but they are not excuses for the terrible treatment he doled out.

What would you say, if able to communicate with them, to the people who suffered under William? Do you believe it matters to them whether or not we remember the details of their experiences?

I think if I were in that situation, I would want the world to know, to remember what happened to me and my people, just the way that the people of Rwanda, for example, wanted their story to be told. The only difference is that in the 11th century the only media were the chronicles and half of these would not have realised that they existed, but I suspect they would want their story told by word of mouth, just the same. I’d like to think that they appreciate that all this time after, someone is feeling their pain.

Bayeux Tapestry, Scene 26: Here the body of King Edward is carried to the Church of Saint Peter the Apostle (by image on web site of Ulrich Harsh [public domain], via Wikimedia Commons). The Bayeux Tapestry tells the story of 1066 in images from the Norman point of view. Click image and scroll to see tapestry in its entirety.
Now for some fun questions!

What are two things you cannot do without?

My ipad and computer.

What website do you visit daily?

[Laughs] Has to be FACEBOOK!

What do you do when you have to queue up?

Huff and puff and mutter obscenities under my breath.

What is your favorite store?

Cripes, I dunno. Anything with books in it. I’d love it if we had a huge Barnes & Noble like you have.

Which season do you resemble the most?

Autumn, nice and matured and full of flavor [laughs].

Paula Lofting, thank you so very much for joining us today as we look back 950 years in our remembrance of 1066 and its enormous impact on English and world history.

Thank you, Lisl, it’s been a pleasure!

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About the author …

Paula has always wanted to write. Since she was a little girl, coming home from school to sit at the table with her notebook and write stories that buzzed around in her head. A prolific reader, she loved nothing better than to spend weekends with a book in her hand. Earliest influences such as Rosemary Sutcliffe, Leon Garfield, Charles Dickens, C.S.Lewis, inspired an interest in history. It became her lifelong wish to one day write and publish a book, but not being able to type, and having no funds for a typewriter to learn on, this ambition was reluctantly put on hold.

With the advent of PCs and a need to retrain and use a computer, this old ambition was stirred and she decided to rekindle her love of books and writing at the grand old age of 42. At this point, she had reached a turning point in her life and studied nursing, and also decided to write the book she had promised herself one day she would write.

Her debut novel, Sons of the Wolf, was first published with the assistance of SilverWood Books in 2012. More recently she has republished it with her new publishing company, Longship Books, in Kindle. A new paperback version will be published by June. It is a story set in the years leading up to the Norman Conquest of England and the first in the Sons of the Wolf series, about this amazing time in English history.

She has always admired the works of Sharon Penman and Bernard Cornwell, Edith Pargetter and Mary Stewart, amongst many others. History is a great love of hers and her interest in the subject goes beyond that of the keyboard. She also enjoys Anglo-Saxon re-enactment with Regia Anglorum, also a great source of research for her writing. Paula says: “Write for enjoyment, write for yourself, regardless of what others say you should; for if you don’t write what you love, then how can you expect others to love what you write.”

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Follow author Paula Lofting and keep up with her news, including her magnificent new blog and impressively researched and written entries about 1066, as well as the upcoming Wolf’s Bane, third in the Sons of the Wolf series. You can find her at her blog, Twitter and Facebook.

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Coin of King Harold Godwinson By PHGCOM [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Note: This post has been updated to replace the previous cover of Sons of the Wolf with its updated design. 

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