Freebie Friday: Giveaway Bonanza!

Need help filling up your shelf? You’ve come to the right place! I think it was last month I started somewhat of a flurry of reviews that came one after the other, many of which have giveaways attached. Typically I hold drawings one to two weeks out, but this time Thanksgiving and upcoming Christmas kind of darted in and out of my schedule and plans, and dates became sort of wonky.

So, for your ease and mine, I decided to post a blog with links to all the drawings in one spot. Simply click on the link (book title) to the review for any book you like the look of and comment there – fancy schmancy not necessary – to get your name in the drawing. (And be sure to leave current contact info in the event you are our winner!) Since some peeps have difficulty commenting at WordPress, I’ve also linked to respective Facebook threads where you can comment instead. You do not need to comment at both; one works perfectly well. Unless otherwise indicated, blurbs are from Amazon and author names link to their websites and/or blog.

There is no limit of books you can enter the drawings for – enter them all if you like!

Drawing to be held December 16 

So without further ado, here are the prizes up for grabs:

Half Sick of Shadows: A Historical Fantasy by Richard Abbott (One paperback copy available, and this author also has December Deals from December 10 – 17)

Who is The Lady?

In ancient Britain, a Lady is living in a stone-walled house on an island in the middle of a river. So far as the people know, she has always been there. They sense her power, they hear her singing, but they never meet her.

At first her life is idyllic. She wakes, she watches, she wanders in her garden, she weaves a complex web of what she sees, and she sleeps again. But as she grows, this pattern becomes narrow and frustrating. She longs to meet those who cherish her, but she cannot. The scenes beyond the walls of her home are different every time she wakes, and everyone she encounters is lost, swallowed up by the past.

But when she finds the courage to break the cycle, there is no going back. Can she bear the cost of finding freedom? And what will her people do, when they finally come face to face with a lady of legend who is not at all what they have imagined?

A retelling – and metamorphosis – of Tennyson’s “Lady of Shalott.”


Lars D. H. Hedbor is offering our winner a choice of any one of his books in paperback. In this case, review links are below and blurbs at author website; click author name to access. (He also has a promotion for free e-copy of The Declaration; click book title to get yours straight away.)

The Light (Tales From a Revolution: New-Jersey)

The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

The Break (Tales From a Revolution: Nova-Scotia) 

Excerpt from The Break

The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

The Darkness (Tales From a Revolution: Maine)

The Path (Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island)

The Prize (Tales From a Revolution: Vermont)

 

 

 

 


Child of the Northern Spring by Persia Woolley (Blogger is gifting one paperback/hardback copy direct from online retailer)

Among the first to look at the story of Camelot through Guinevere’s eyes, Woolley sets the traditional tale in the time of its origin, after Britain has shattered into warring fiefdoms. Hampered by neither fantasy nor medieval romance, this young Guinevere is a feisty Celtic tomboy who sees no reason why she must learn to speak Latin, wear dresses, and go south to marry that king. But legends being what they are, the story of Arthur’s rise to power soon intrigues her, and when they finally meet, Guinevere and Arthur form a partnership that has lasted for 1500 years.

This is Arthurian epic at its best-filled with romance, adventure, authentic Dark Ages detail, and wonderfully human people.


Insurrectio and Retalio by Alison Morton (Two prizes: one e-copy of each book)

In Insurrectio

‘The second fall of Rome?’ Aurelia Mitela, ex-Praetorian and imperial councillor in Roma Nova, scoffs at her intelligence chief when he throws a red file on her desk. But 1980s Roma Nova, the last province of the Roman Empire that has survived into the twentieth century, has problems – a ruler frightened of governing, a centuries-old bureaucracy creaking for reform and, worst of all, a rising nationalist movement with a charismatic leader. Horrified when her daughter is brutally attacked in a demonstration turned riot, Aurelia tries to rally resistance to the growing fear and instability. But it may already be too late to save Roma Nova from meltdown and herself from entrapment and destruction by her lifelong enemy…

And Retalio

Early 1980s Vienna. Recovering from a near fatal shooting, Aurelia Mitela, ex-Praetorian and former foreign minister of Roma Nova, chafes at her enforced exile. She barely escaped from her nemesis, the charming and amoral Caius Tellus who grabbed power in Roma Nova, the only part of the Roman Empire to survive into the twentieth century. Aurelia’s duty and passion fire her determination to take back her homeland and liberate its people. But Caius’s manipulations have isolated her from her fellow exiles, leaving her ostracised, powerless and vulnerable. But without their trust and support Aurelia knows she will never see Roma Nova again.


There is Always A Tomorrow by Anna Belfrage (One e-book available)

It is 1692 and the Colony of Maryland is still adapting to the consequences of Coode’s Rebellion some years previously. Religious tolerance in the colony is now a thing of the past, but safe in their home, Alex and Matthew Graham have no reason to suspect they will become embroiled in the ongoing religious conflicts—until one of their sons betrays their friend Carlos Muñoz to the authorities.

Matthew Graham does not leave his friends to rot—not even if they’re papist priests—so soon enough most of the Graham family is involved in a rescue attempt, desperate to save Carlos from a sentence that may well kill him. Meanwhile, in London little Rachel is going through hell. In a matter of months she loses everything, even her surname, as apparently her father is not Master Cooke but one Jacob Graham. Not that her paternity matters when her entire life implodes.

Will Alex and Matthew be able to help their unknown grandchild? More importantly, will Rachel want their help?


Hearts Never Change by Joanne R. Larner (One paperback copy available)

Richard III as you have never seen him before! Richard has been King of England and France and Lord of Ireland for over twenty years and he is beginning to question his life. He misses his secret wife, Rose, who had to return to the twenty-first century when she found she was expecting twins, both for her own and the babies’ safety. Everyone around the king seems to be happily in a relationship. The realm is at peace and his son and heir, Richard junior, is of an age to take over the reins of government, so Richard makes a decision…


Good luck to all!!!

Update: Some of the older reviews for the Tales From a Revolution series are unlinked as they were done before the drawing was planned.

Feel free to comment there anyway OR at any other review from that series OR below on this post OR at this post’s Facebook thread, located here

Whichever is easiest for you; we’ll be checking them all. 🙂

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Book Review: Dickon’s Diaries (With Giveaway)

We present this review on this, the 565th anniversary of the birth of Richard Plantagenet,

Duke of Gloucester and,

Dei Gratia Rex Angliae et Franciae et Dominus Hiberniae

by the Grace of God, King Richard III of England and France and Lord of Ireland.

800px-King_Richard_III
Late 16th-century portrait, housed in the National Portrait Gallery, London. See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Dickon’s Diaries – A Yeare in the Lyff of King Richard the Third
by Joanne Larner and Susan Lamb

See below for details about winning a free, signed copy of Dickon’s Diaries!

A few years ago I had opportunity to see a bit of social media shenanigans in which a well-known image of King Richard III was shopped to include the monarch wearing a Santa hat. It was Christmas, after all, though one person was not amused and demanded it be removed for the king to keep his dignity, wintry wonder or not.

But why should it be undignified? Can a person not stand tall while simultaneously engaging in mirth, something that will bring pleasure to others? One of the reasons I didn’t see it quite the way the lady who doth protest is because in my estimation it was drawing Richard into our activity, sharing our joy with him by him becoming “one of us” for the moment.

Joanne Larner and Susan Lamb do similar in Dickon’s Diaries, though I would add that the effect is greater because their inclusion moves in both directions. While Christmas in Richard’s time was not observed in the way we do now, keeping a diary or some sort of recordkeeping encompasses all ages. Moreover, all people have some thoughts they generally keep to themselves or within a circle of confidantes, so the concept would not be completely unknown to people then or now.

As the title gives away, Dickon’s Diaries presents a year in the life of Richard III; the book takes us through Sprynge, Summer, Autumne and Wynter, all of which encompass their attendant activities and a group of modern ladies quite fond of the king, who heretofore had shared his words of wisdom on Ye Book of Faces, and now “hath wryttn down alle Oure thoughts and anecdotes for your pleasure.” See? Even the king wills it. For our enjoyment he draws us in to share his modern experiences and bids us read on.

Dickon’s Diaries is an entertaining, light-hearted look at a medieval king who, via a bridge spanning time, engages in modern activities and responds to them, often hilariously. The Dames who dote on him make their appearances, showing affection and often providing explanation and links between what he knows of the world and that presented to him in this modern age. With a fondness for Jaffa cakes, a Capp of Chino on occasion and a growing collection of “My Little Destrier” (chronically missing a difficult-to-acquire prize piece on Ye-Bay, the “Murderous Mustang”), Richard makes his way with aplomb from episode to episode, documenting each and even advising others in an “agony uncle” column established for that purpose.

Shortly before a cake-baking competition, one nervous subject, Miss Cilla Goose, writes in for a solution to her nail-biting habit, especially given that her Grace will be judge. Assuring Miss Goose of his impartiality, Dickon then directs her to a local nail spa, where its proprietor will ensure that her nails “verily do shine and sparkle.” In his post script: “We suggest thou maketh a fruite cake—Oure currant favourite. (Didst thou see what We did there?)”

One of the best elements of the book is within its nuance, in that its wit is diversified and even subtle at times. The women who often surround him occasionally appear themselves as subject of his comments, wound into self-deprecating humor that keeps the king likeable while still able to pull off the occasional conceit. Catching sight of a particular Dame in the stands at a tournament, he bows and asks her favor. “Of course, she swooned. (We doth have this effect on alle female creatures, with the exception of Oure wyff.)”

The king is indeed hotheaded, silly or serious at times; wrapped within these (and other) emotions and elsewhere through the book are historical references that range from the obvious –

“Nay, manne! ‘Tis not the rhymes! Thou didst say: ‘Roses are redd!’ Surely thou didth meaneth ‘Roses are whyte’! Now get thee hence and changeth this treasonous verse forthwith!”

—to the artful:

‘Twas a few weeks ago that We didst consult Our box of lights [computer] … Then, lo, We didst espy a sett of changes of apparell for [My Little Destrier] also. Ye knowest fulle welle that destriers canst be caparisoned in Oure coloures and Oure standard; welle, now can ye buyeth various different cognizants, useful for ye Stanleys, We suppose, who hath always been known for changynge their coates! (Smirks.)

The narrative is also cunningly sprinkled with Shakespearean references, telling given the real playwright’s relationship to Richard Plantagenet as his protagonist. After the long-suffering Lovell devises an entertainment plan to shake off the winter blues, an “interesting manne” shows up, stating that he “is within this tent to writeth a goodly storie of us, but the musick shall bother him not, for he is a tadd hard of hearynge.” This opens up for readers to imagine or concoct a variety of comical possibilities as to how the bard got it so wrong.

As the event opens the “welcomynge speech … read[s] thus”:

Now is the winter of Oure Dis-co-tecke, made glorious summer with sandwiches of pork, and crisps, subtleties and fancies.”

Before starting the book, I’d wondered if I would have difficulty reading extended amounts of dialect, but this proved not to be a worry. The fancy font most of the book is written in may appear to be problematic when first starting out, but one gets used to it rather quickly, and it is large enough to be reader friendly. Speaking of friendly, the aforementioned woman on the social media would be happy to know (one would hope) that Richard always does maintain his dignity, even if he must engage in a series of frowns, glowers and shakes of his head in disbelief to get his point across.

Of course, we don’t know precisely what the real Richard was like in his own time. Would he have laughed at ribald jokes or seen the sparkle in silly word play? Would he be amused at the authors’ portrayal of Shakespeare, who disparaged him in a manner that echoed through the centuries? Since he was found in 2012 – within the book a topic addressed to which he queries the ability of a nation to lose its king, and the authors treat with perfect balance of the comic as well as reverence within jest – a number of “certainties” have been debunked. So why not the possibility that he had a rollicking sense of humor as well!?

If joking around for some doesn’t include modern words used within medieval speech or activities, or medieval English employed not exactly in the way it would have been in the fifteenth century, well, there’s a reason for that. Especially given the rowing over where to re-inter the king, as the authors mention in their end notes, there certainly seemed room for a bit of cheer, and that’s what this is meant to be: a light-hearted expression of Richard presenting the possibility that, indeed, he too liked to get away from the stress at times and have a bit of laughter and merriment. The diaries never claim to be what they are not, and what they are not is not its aim.

Sometimes naughty, occasionally fantastical, always clever and filled with exuberant energy, Dickon’s Diaries is the anecdote for a rough day or object of an evening’s pleasurable reading. Anyone who even periodically enjoys social media funniness, those interested in Richard III or even the uninitiated would get a great kick out of the diaries, since the “prior knowledge” involved in some of the jokes tend to be the sort most know about already (e.g. Shakespeare). Its narrative brings everybody into the moment because we all find ourselves in the midst of hilarious misunderstandings and funny fusion of cultural habits familiar and foreign, even when they are from our own time.

Despite its lack of strict adherence to period speech, the authors most definitely show themselves in a variety of ways to be keen observers of language, and we are given ample opportunity to verily bathe in the freewheeling frolics within the narrative as well as dialogue. Additionally, what the characters seem to be thinking and feeling shows up in illustrator Riikka Nikko’s drawings wholly, and the impression of them entices us into events depicted. One gets an inkling not just for the characters’ experiences, but also the environment in the actual moment, the sense of what is happening and a feel of involvement within it all. I actually would have loved to see more of these pictures included and hope that in the second volume there will be.

Dickon’s Diaries is a whirling, laugh-out-loud experience of a read that is easily re-enacted, given its light hilarity and easily digestible segments (chapters within each season). Filled with flavor, fun and individuals – some of whom are real, including writers and musicians! – readers will want to get to know even more, and can participate in on Ye Book of Faces or even within their own experimentation. With a place for everyone, Richard comes to us and we to him; together we can stand and celebrate the best parts of life.

Now readeth ye on!

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Would you like to win a free, autographed paperback copy of Dickon’s Diaries? Of course you would! Simply comment below – even a quickie hello works! – and you are automatically entered into the drawing, which will occur in three weeks. Please make sure we have a way to contact you! Alternately, you may comment at the pinned post in the blog’s page on Ye Book of Faces, located here

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Click here to see my review of Richard Liveth Yet: A Historical Novel Set in the Present Day,

and for my review of Richard Liveth Yet (Book II): A Foreign Country, click here.

Stay tuned for my review of Richard Liveth Yet (Book III): Hearts Never Change

About the authors …

Joanne Larner was born in London and moved to Rayleigh in Essex (UK) in 2001. She has wanted to write a novel since the age of thirteen and finally managed it in 2015. She was helped by two things: National Novel Writing Month and Richard III. Richard was her inspiration and she became fascinated by him when she saw the Channel 4 documentary The King in the Car Park in February 2013. She researched his life and times and read countless novels, but became fed up because they all ended the same way – with his death at the Battle of Bosworth.

So she decided to write a different type of Richard story and added a time travel element. The rest is (literally) history. She found his character seemed to write itself and with NaNoWriMo giving her the impetus to actually DO it, she succeeded. After she began writing the story that was in her head, she found that there was far too much material for one book and, in fact, it finally turned into a trilogy consisting of Richard Liveth Yet (Book I); Richard Liveth Yet (Book II): A Foreign Country and Richard Liveth Yet (Book III): Hearts Never Change. The final installment takes place mainly in Richard’s time and Joanne found that many actual historical elements seemed to match serendipitously with her requirements. For example, the characters who were contemporary to Richard, the date of Joana’s death, the fact that Lorenzo’s wife, Clarice, had twins that didn’t survive the birth, etc.

In the event you simply cannot wait for the drawing and possibly win a free signed copy of one of Joanne’s books, you may purchase Richard Liveth Yet (Book I) at Blurb, Amazon or Amazon UKRichard Liveth Yet (Book II): A Foreign Country at Blurb, Amazon and Amazon UK and Richard Liveth Yet (Book III): Hearts Never Change at Blurb, Amazon and Amazon UK.  Dickon’s Diaries – A Yeare in the Lyff of King Richard the Third is available on Blurb, Amazon and Amazon UK. The pair will again team up for a second volume, and Joanne  is working on another Richard book, which will be called Distant Echoes and will involve a fictional technology, Richard’s DNA and his story in his own words. Joanne is pleased to add that she has recently had a story published in The Box Under the Bed: An Anthology of Scary Stories from 20 Authors, available at Amazon and Amazon UK.

To follow Joanne Larner and her writing, sign up or follow her at Facebook, Twitter and her blog.

Susan Lamb writes …

I am a staunch Ricardian, I love to visit places associated with Richard III, and I’m convinced that he was not responsible for the disappearance of the boys in the tower. I also love reading, I’m a passionate supporter of the Redwings horses too, and the Greyhounds. I live in the West Midlands with my husband Ray, my mom, and not forgetting Beauty the Greyhound.

Dickon’s Diaries came into being because originally I wrote (and still do) a Facebook page called “Dickon for His Dames,” where I write as him. I was talking to Joanne one day, and both Joanne and myself felt that too much was written about the seriousness, duty, and cares of his life, and we wanted to inject  a little humour into an otherwise sad story as we felt that too much was written about his ultimate demise. So our book started there, and it’s not making fun of him at all, far from it, we’re having fun with him and not at his expense, unlike some other books we’ve seen.

So, Muddleham is a euphemism of Middleham,  a kind of alternative universe, a little like Brigadoon I guess! Where he lives happily with his wife Anne, son Edward and Lovell, his trusty sidekick. His dames who visit him are all more than a little in love with him! White Syrie his horse has a mind of his own, and his staff and neighbours adore him, especially the buxom baker lady. Edward gets into many scrapes with the blacksmith’s son, and his essay for school left a lot to be desired! We are currently working on book two, where Anne will voice her opinions occasionally, so will Lovell, and there will be a lot more fun to come!

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A copy of Dickon’s Diaries – A Yeare in the Lyff of King Richard the Third was provided by the authors in exchange for an honest review. 

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Author photo courtesy Joanne R. Larner

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Illustrations used with the gracious permission of Riikka Nikko

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