Book Review: The Mine (Tales from a Revolution – Connecticut) by Lars D.H. Hedbor

The Mine (Tales From a Revolution — Connecticut)
by Lars D. H. Hedbor

When I prepared myself to read the next installment in author Lars D.H. Hedbor’s Tales from a Revolution series, I knew chances were high I’d enjoy the story. Set during the American Revolution, each young adult novel in a different colony, the books capture a snapshot in time within the lives of fictional characters who very well could have actually existed. As an amateur historian, astronomer, fiddler, home brewer, linguist and baker, Hedbor is well placed to know a thing or two about this era and the ordinary details of people’s lives. It was this that attracted me to the series in the beginning because, as I’ve repeatedly stated, there is much to love and admire in the ordinary, from the versatility to variety, how people relate to one another, what they notice in their lives and what is important to them. When faced with war, some of this changes; much of it does not. They still have to keep their teeth clean, plough the fields, collect groceries and—in spite of or perhaps because of the war—they continue to do things such as dream about their futures and fall in love.

Continue reading ” Book Review: The Mine (Tales from a Revolution – Connecticut) by Lars D.H. Hedbor”

Book Review: The Tree: Tales From a Revolution — New-Hampshire

The Tree: Tales From a Revolution — New-Hampshire
by Lars D. H. Hedbor

Having previously read almost every Hedbor book written, it was a delight to see this author’s latest, The Tree: Tales From a Revolution — New-Hampshire, recently peeping from my postbox. That right there should give readers an immediate heads up that opening a new tab for book buying is in order. I enjoy Hedbor’s characters, the diversity of which is impressive indeed—diversity not being used for its own sake. It speaks to his research capabilities and creative skills that the author could come up with the individuals and backgrounds he has, and realistically reflects our history and why those who populated it perceived events as they did. A Spanish sailor, breakaway loyalists, Quaker congregation, freed slave, grownups and youth, male and female—the list goes on, but one thing they all have in common is their ordinariness. Through Hedbor’s storytelling charms, we see not only victors, nor just the elite: we see us.

Trees are symbolic of much in our histories and spiritual intellect, not least of which is the ideal of life and liberty, both growing entities requiring nourishment. Abe’s father, a lumber cutter, realizes both ideals as he embarks upon a career providing lumber for London housebuilding, though the king’s mast laws regulate which pines he may use, despite them standing on Sawyer’s own property. Not unlike medieval forest laws, violations are punishable by jail or, preferable to the government, fines, which are little more than veiled taxes. Unrest is growing over this oppression, and when Abe is suddenly orphaned, he must take over the management duties against this backdrop as he navigates his auntie’s negative personality and a strange new friendship with Betty and her ever-present raven companion.

As always, Hedbor’s people occupy a skillfully managed narrative in which historical remoteness dissolves and we witness their daily lives amidst this growing upheaval. One we are unsure is trustworthy, another a milquetoast with dreams of a thieving bird in service to the king, and still another an outsider with a mysterious past. The author does, however, leave plenty of space for the development and distribution of secrets and intrigue, and the tension builds as each person’s character arc, to varying degrees, flowers in the pursuit of the liberty to be. This occurs in various forms, most notably the acquisition of a skill that nourishes liberty, a circumstance that in turn reflects the reality of life paired with death and the ongoing sacrifices required for it to flourish. It is a sober set of thoughts for people whose lives will soon be lived amidst the fire of war as they uproot and are uprooted while they simultaneously plant the tree of liberty still referenced by Americans today.

One thing I like best about these tales is the inclusion of food, and Hedbor has a knack for fitting it into the narrative without ruffling the fabric of the story. Abe’s spinster Aunt Rosanna, for example, makes her way partly by selling eggs, even through the bitter months:

She pointed to a barrel in the corner of the kitchen. “Since we’re coming into the winter season, the chickens won’t lay as much until spring. Some have already slowed down, because of their molt. We need to put eggs away for the winter, and they go in that barrel. Once there are enough to make a layer, we’ll cover them with the slaked lime I’ll keep in the pitcher beside it. Preserves them all through the winter, so it’s worth the expense.”

 Also utilizing his linguistics background, Hedbor portrays a woman whose no-nonsense perspective is reflected in the words she omits as much as those she chooses. Economic sentences, often harshly delivered, stand opposite those of Abe’s earnest and unsophisticated nature. Like the raven, who seems to show up around every corner these days, however, he is observant, and asks himself questions even if he doesn’t always verbalize them. This facilitates his friendship with Betty, as Hedbor seamlessly weaves together these and other elements of a story that provides both a broad understanding of how and why the New Hampshire colonists took one step closer to revolution, and a closer view of the individuals of that colony, who, without these Tales From a Revolution, would remain hidden within the shadows of history.

One of the most gripping of all Hedbor’s Tales, I was unable to put this book down and read it in one sitting. As readers proceed through events in the novel, especially knowing many are drawn from the documented history of New Hampshire’s 1772 Pine Tree Riot, we grow a better understanding of the colonists’ grievances and why they acted as they did. Once again Hedbor restores humanity to figures who were real, living people as opposed to those who existed in a distant and vague era. We grow to care about them both as characters as well as the ancestors of ours that they are. Thought-provoking to say the least, this is a rewarding read that will remain with readers long after the last page is turned.

To see information on each book, click here.

Really fun interview with Lars Hedbor here.

You may also wish to have a peek at my previous reviews for
Tales From a Revolution—

The Freedman (Tales From a Revolution: North-Carolina)

The Break (Tales From a Revolution: Nova-Scotia) 

The Path (Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island)

The Darkness (Tales From a Revolution: Maine)

The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

The Light (Tales From a Revolution: New-Jersey)

The Prize (Tales From a Revolution: Vermont)

Get your free e-copy of The Declaration!

About the author ….

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and was a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

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You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Tree may be purchased at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, iTunes and Kobo.

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Author photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

Free copy of The Tree provided by author, with no expectation of a full review. 

Book Review: The Freedman (Tales From a Revolution: North-Carolina) (Brand Spanking New Release)

The Freedman (Tales from a Revolution: North-Carolina)
by Lars D.H. Hedbor

Release Date: May 31, 2018

Mark your calendars! Book signing with Lars Hedbor:
June 9, 2018 at Jan’s Paperbacks!

Author Lars D.H. Hedbor has asked himself countless times, “What made the American colonists turn their backs on their king and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?” Naturally there is no single answer, though he probes history in his series, Tales From a Revolution, searching for the ones that are perhaps most identifiable, common, relatable, recognizable—answers that come from the lives of ordinary people and not just as historically and intellectually written out in the annals of our time as a colony and a nation.

Tales From a Revolution moves through and settles within various regions during an assortment of periods, observing individuals and families as their lives play out within the ebb and flow of fortunes, history, and revolution. In his latest installment, The Freedman, Hedbor takes us to North Carolina, where the slave Calabar is suddenly granted liberty after years of toiling on his late master’s indigo plantation. The man’s son and heir, indifferent to this particular product, turns Calabar off his land, and the formerly bonded man unexpectedly faces the question of what to do with his own freedom.

Grieving at the sudden separation from his wife and baby girl and plunged into a society that struggles within its own bonds, Calabar endeavors to find a balance within the surprising variety of responses to his appearance amongst the townspeople—and his to them. As he repels enemies close to home and a new one appears when revolution draws nearer, the freedman takes steps and makes decisions to determine his own life and the paths he will walk. While his hopes and fears are both recognizable and foreign to those around him, Calabar’s choices will play into the rise or fall of a nation in the making.

With The Freedman, Hedbor not only continues his pattern of producing a quality tale, but also demonstrates his wide imagination with the plots and people he brings to life. Calabar is not the first character to appear outside the bounds of ordinary colonist, but does strike a unique note in the author writing from the point of view of a former slave. It is a daring choice, and Hedbor gives us a win: Calabar is unfamiliar with the ways of the larger society he has until now regarded as a free one, and his intelligence is not naturally paired to its patterns. However, his determination and willingness to admit to himself he doesn’t know something, aid him in making his way, and he begins to understand on a deeper level how alike and different he and the others are, often in ways they do not. Through Calabar’s eyes, we perform a study of our hearts and his, further bringing to bear on our understanding of our own history the questions Hedbor initially asked himself about our ancestors.

This chapter in the Tales is perhaps one of the most subtle Hedbor has yet produced. Woven through the narrative as deeply as Calabar’s indigo on material are passages that often speak to more in the larger picture.

The captain’s face registered a moment of surprise, and then he turned his full attention to Calabar. Under the man’s piercing gaze, Calabar felt as though he were laid bare in both body and soul, the captain’s eyes a physical force as they roved over his face and limbs. He felt acutely self-conscious of the contrast between the rough clothing he still wore while they awaited the tailor’s work, and the hat perched on his head like a shield against the judgement of the world.

 In this, one of Calabar’s transitional moments between his old life and new, we see more than the freeman’s assessment of a former slave: it is a microcosm of the colony itself as it determines its path and the people’s own preparation for it. In this manner the colony is silent partner to Calabar’s more open statement of who he is becoming as both take stock of themselves, both still imprisoned by the measurement of others, both echoing the words once spoken by Calabar’s Affey: “Our hearts are still our own.”

It is nothing short of magnificent that Hedbor writes these characters, with their fantastically diverse backgrounds, as convincingly as he does. It should be noted that the author also distinguishes Calabar’s speech in two ways: one to portray a good faith representation of the English he would have spoken, having begun to speak it at about age ten. Within that, he distinguishes the freedman’s speech between insider and outsider listeners, and the aim is precise, for we “hear” Calabar with the likely accent without it making a negative statement about his intelligence.

While perhaps also one of Hedbor’s most sentimental novels in content, The Freedman avoids falling into the maudlin in practice. It can be both difficult and harrowing to engage in introspection, to recognize how others see us, even if some of those judgements view ways not entirely of our making. The story’s plot in itself conveys that realization, while the author’s dialogue, narrative, imagery and representations carry it out, with a raw sort of beauty whose naked utility leads us all the way to present day. As we look back upon the lovely picked up along the way, sprouting from the hearts of those with hopes and fears, those we know and that we don’t, we begin to recognize why they did it, what they knew of their hearts and ours, despite the differences of circumstance and centuries.

Highly recommended for anyone familiar or not with Hedbor’s previous work, The Freedman is a more than worthy successor with much more to say each time we revisit.

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To see information on each book, click here.

You may also wish to have a peek at my previous reviews for
Tales From a Revolution—

The Prize (Tales From a Revolution: Vermont)

The Light (Tales From a Revolution: New-Jersey)

The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

The Break (Tales From a Revolution: Nova-Scotia) 

The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

The Darkness (Tales From a Revolution: Maine)

The Path (Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island)

Get your free e-copy of The Declaration!

About the author ….

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and was a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

*********

You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Freedman may be purchased in paperback* (signed copies available upon request), at Kindle, Nook, iBooks, or Kobo.(Paperbacks also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble links.)

*soon to be added

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Author photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

The blogger received an advance reader copy of
The Freedman to facilitate an honest review

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Book Review: The Break (Plus Giveaway)

The Break (Tales From a Revolution: Nova-Scotia)
by Lars D.H. Hedbor

Would you like to win a FREE paperback copy of any one of Lars Hedbor’s novels?
Simply comment below OR at this review’s Facebook thread, located here. Drawing will  be held on December 16.

In the capable hands of Lars D.H. Hedbor, the American Revolution gets a great storyboard from which to relate its events—and we do mean great given the sheer volume of story in between the pages of eight young adult novels that portray the lives of ordinary people during this time of upheaval and transformation. Traveling from region to region, Hedbor’s historical fiction peeks into details history books necessarily do not, filling it in with authentic characters whose lives touch ours and show that it isn’t always historical giants whose words or deeds mean something in the great scheme of things.

History is written by the winner, so the saying goes, and this is certainly evident in our own knowledge of the Revolution, its civil war like nature often unacknowledged. The Break addresses this as the author in this installment places his focus on Susannah Mills, a Massachusetts girl whose loyalist father evacuates them to Halifax when the protesting of angry colonists shifts toward violence, endangering, in his estimation, their community.

Much of this tale of disruption and betrayal is told in letters back and forth between Susannah and her lifelong friend, Emma, who stays behind, an insightful technique on Hedbor’s part. The reader’s circumstance of being removed from the far-off situations reflects the writers’ own, and we get not only a personal sense of what it was like to read from afar. The dispatches depicting incidents outdated by the time they reach their destinations, we also know a bit more than the characters do regarding how it all will play out. But observation of their own following of affairs and relying on missives, the hopes for and fears of alive in the narrative, lends such poignancy to episodes, particularly as they are related in the words of those experiencing them; we wear their shoes and gain greater insight into the nature of “the enemy” who, in so many instances, is not so different to us. Indeed, war tests us all in ways we often don’t anticipate, and Susannah relays to Emma her fears of and disgust for rebel forces:

At the same time, though it would seem madness to so engage in the face of so many seasoned & disciplined men of the King’s army, the air is here filled with words of intrigue & plots, & I can only imagine what tales you are hearing of events & conditions here. We are particularly alarmed by the stronghold of New-England men in the vicinity of the former fort at the St. John river, who have declared that they will conduct no business with those who maintain loyalty to the King. The military garrison here does not seem inclined to dispense with this threat, & in truth, some of those who have made the boldest statement against the King in public are all too happy to take our money in private.

 A literary look at the perception of the enemy is fraught with peril, one danger being the vilification of one’s own people, something Hedbor adroitly avoids. In spotlighting ordinary royalists, he portrays a number of goodly actions, such as honesty and faithfulness. However, his characters’ actions do at times admit to us that they, too, face behavioral challenges. One bald-face lies, pretending to be witness to arson, rape and murder committed by rebels; another flirts with treason and Susannah’s own father engages in socially unacceptable behavior. The author’s even hand has no need to demonize one to honestly assess the other. As in the words of one loyalist, “I do not think that we need to exaggerate the ill-mannered actions of our foes in order to support the continued energetic opposition to their goals.”

As always, Hedbor’s language usage and food features also suit the era, though in The Break this seems to beautifully stand out more. Susannah’s letters are liberally sprinkled with ampersands, that symbol we so often see in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century writing, along with her random capitalization and archaic words such as divers (many). We see such discussions as folkloric methods on butter churning and a song to accompany the task.

Come butter come

Come butter come

Peter stands at the gate

Waiting for a buttered cake.

 The greater feel of food and correspondence here likely relates to our protagonist being female, thus a bit more isolated from at least some hostilities than males of the era. However, the roles played by historical elements of women’s world in The Break is never extraneous and Susannah has critical battles of her own to prosecute. The intersection between these two trajectories is fitted so perfectly that we can easily distinguish the girl’s intelligence, perseverance and passion.

Reading a portion of the Revolution from the loyalist perspective is a change of pace, but also informative and brings to the fore the realities of division created amongst many of those who were otherwise quite close: friends, family, countrymen. We see how some of our own history travels to far-flung spots (Nova Scotia, England) and it is somewhat fascinating to contemplate, via Hedbor’s tale, those whose American roots may yet remain buried there under layers of genealogy. Of course, this is not a new reflection, but one that promotes a re-unification of sorts, after that long-ago division.

There also is some thrill in spotting recognizable names,

and I await your next missive with my Heart prepared for any manner of Joy that may be brought to a person [Emma writes]. Here our situation is subject to continued Improvements. The rebel Washington—formerly a Colonel in the King’s service, tho, they say, one much given to dourness and Error—is everywhere on the Run, and it can be only a matter of Time before he is brought to Justice, and his armies disbanded forever.

Susannah’s friend goes on to talk about the “dashing Notices of our General Howe’s successes in the field” and other goings-on, unaware of the role Hedbor assigns us as omnipotent readers and the turnaround soon to take place, nevertheless motivating us to consider history and all the what might have beens. Historical fiction that moves us enough to look into it apart from the story itself is powerful indeed, and Lars Hedbor’s storyboard stirring that sort of inspiration—which it does and then some, no matter where one picks up in the series—is all that much greater.

To read an excerpt from The Break, click here.

For information on each book, click here.

A really fabulous, very rewarding chat with Lars Hedbor is here.

You may also wish to have a peek at my previous reviews for Tales From a Revolution

The Prize (Tales From a Revolution: Vermont)

The Light (Tales From a Revolution: New-Jersey)

The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

The Darkness (Tales From a Revolution: Maine)

The Path (Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island)

Get your free e-copy of The Declaration!

About the author ….

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and will be a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

*********

You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Break may be purchased in paperback (signed copies available upon request), as Kindle, Nook, iBooks, Kobo or at Smashwords. (Paperbacks also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble links.)

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Author photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

The blogger received a courtesy copy of The Break to facilitate an honest review

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Freebie Friday: Giveaway Bonanza!

Need help filling up your shelf? You’ve come to the right place! I think it was last month I started somewhat of a flurry of reviews that came one after the other, many of which have giveaways attached. Typically I hold drawings one to two weeks out, but this time Thanksgiving and upcoming Christmas kind of darted in and out of my schedule and plans, and dates became sort of wonky.

So, for your ease and mine, I decided to post a blog with links to all the drawings in one spot. Simply click on the link (book title) to the review for any book you like the look of and comment there – fancy schmancy not necessary – to get your name in the drawing. (And be sure to leave current contact info in the event you are our winner!) Since some peeps have difficulty commenting at WordPress, I’ve also linked to respective Facebook threads where you can comment instead. You do not need to comment at both; one works perfectly well. Unless otherwise indicated, blurbs are from Amazon and author names link to their websites and/or blog.

There is no limit of books you can enter the drawings for – enter them all if you like!

Drawing to be held December 16 

So without further ado, here are the prizes up for grabs:

Half Sick of Shadows: A Historical Fantasy by Richard Abbott (One paperback copy available, and this author also has December Deals from December 10 – 17)

Who is The Lady?

In ancient Britain, a Lady is living in a stone-walled house on an island in the middle of a river. So far as the people know, she has always been there. They sense her power, they hear her singing, but they never meet her.

At first her life is idyllic. She wakes, she watches, she wanders in her garden, she weaves a complex web of what she sees, and she sleeps again. But as she grows, this pattern becomes narrow and frustrating. She longs to meet those who cherish her, but she cannot. The scenes beyond the walls of her home are different every time she wakes, and everyone she encounters is lost, swallowed up by the past.

But when she finds the courage to break the cycle, there is no going back. Can she bear the cost of finding freedom? And what will her people do, when they finally come face to face with a lady of legend who is not at all what they have imagined?

A retelling – and metamorphosis – of Tennyson’s “Lady of Shalott.”


Lars D. H. Hedbor is offering our winner a choice of any one of his books in paperback. In this case, review links are below and blurbs at author website; click author name to access. (He also has a promotion for free e-copy of The Declaration; click book title to get yours straight away.)

The Light (Tales From a Revolution: New-Jersey)

The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

The Break (Tales From a Revolution: Nova-Scotia) 

Excerpt from The Break

The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

The Darkness (Tales From a Revolution: Maine)

The Path (Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island)

The Prize (Tales From a Revolution: Vermont)

 

 

 

 


Child of the Northern Spring by Persia Woolley (Blogger is gifting one paperback/hardback copy direct from online retailer)

Among the first to look at the story of Camelot through Guinevere’s eyes, Woolley sets the traditional tale in the time of its origin, after Britain has shattered into warring fiefdoms. Hampered by neither fantasy nor medieval romance, this young Guinevere is a feisty Celtic tomboy who sees no reason why she must learn to speak Latin, wear dresses, and go south to marry that king. But legends being what they are, the story of Arthur’s rise to power soon intrigues her, and when they finally meet, Guinevere and Arthur form a partnership that has lasted for 1500 years.

This is Arthurian epic at its best-filled with romance, adventure, authentic Dark Ages detail, and wonderfully human people.


Insurrectio and Retalio by Alison Morton (Two prizes: one e-copy of each book)

In Insurrectio

‘The second fall of Rome?’ Aurelia Mitela, ex-Praetorian and imperial councillor in Roma Nova, scoffs at her intelligence chief when he throws a red file on her desk. But 1980s Roma Nova, the last province of the Roman Empire that has survived into the twentieth century, has problems – a ruler frightened of governing, a centuries-old bureaucracy creaking for reform and, worst of all, a rising nationalist movement with a charismatic leader. Horrified when her daughter is brutally attacked in a demonstration turned riot, Aurelia tries to rally resistance to the growing fear and instability. But it may already be too late to save Roma Nova from meltdown and herself from entrapment and destruction by her lifelong enemy…

And Retalio

Early 1980s Vienna. Recovering from a near fatal shooting, Aurelia Mitela, ex-Praetorian and former foreign minister of Roma Nova, chafes at her enforced exile. She barely escaped from her nemesis, the charming and amoral Caius Tellus who grabbed power in Roma Nova, the only part of the Roman Empire to survive into the twentieth century. Aurelia’s duty and passion fire her determination to take back her homeland and liberate its people. But Caius’s manipulations have isolated her from her fellow exiles, leaving her ostracised, powerless and vulnerable. But without their trust and support Aurelia knows she will never see Roma Nova again.


There is Always A Tomorrow by Anna Belfrage (One e-book available)

It is 1692 and the Colony of Maryland is still adapting to the consequences of Coode’s Rebellion some years previously. Religious tolerance in the colony is now a thing of the past, but safe in their home, Alex and Matthew Graham have no reason to suspect they will become embroiled in the ongoing religious conflicts—until one of their sons betrays their friend Carlos Muñoz to the authorities.

Matthew Graham does not leave his friends to rot—not even if they’re papist priests—so soon enough most of the Graham family is involved in a rescue attempt, desperate to save Carlos from a sentence that may well kill him. Meanwhile, in London little Rachel is going through hell. In a matter of months she loses everything, even her surname, as apparently her father is not Master Cooke but one Jacob Graham. Not that her paternity matters when her entire life implodes.

Will Alex and Matthew be able to help their unknown grandchild? More importantly, will Rachel want their help?


Hearts Never Change by Joanne R. Larner (One paperback copy available)

Richard III as you have never seen him before! Richard has been King of England and France and Lord of Ireland for over twenty years and he is beginning to question his life. He misses his secret wife, Rose, who had to return to the twenty-first century when she found she was expecting twins, both for her own and the babies’ safety. Everyone around the king seems to be happily in a relationship. The realm is at peace and his son and heir, Richard junior, is of an age to take over the reins of government, so Richard makes a decision…


Good luck to all!!!

Update: Some of the older reviews for the Tales From a Revolution series are unlinked as they were done before the drawing was planned.

Feel free to comment there anyway OR at any other review from that series OR below on this post OR at this post’s Facebook thread, located here

Whichever is easiest for you; we’ll be checking them all. 🙂

Book Excerpt: The Break (Lars D.H. Hedbor) (Plus Giveaway)

Please see below for information about how you could win a FREE
paperback copy of a Lars Hedbor novel of your choice.

Update: Drawing will be held December 16 (see link here)

The Battle of Bunker Hill was a turning point in the American Revolution, but it’s all too easy to forget that it came at a steep cost—and not just to the Americans, who lost the incomparable Joseph Warren that day, but to the British and their Loyalist allies, who died in their hundreds. In The Break, a Loyalist evacuee learns of one such loss in a letter from a friend who remained in Massachusetts. —Lars D.H. Hedbor

 

Battle of Bunker Hill, by Howard Pyle, c. 1897. It was a Pyrrhic victory for the British, who suffered losses of over a third of their troops, many more in numbers than the Americans incurred, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Twenty-First June, ‘75

My dearest Susannah,

I write to you with a heart utterly Destroyed by the late Events in this Ruined Paradise. The worst News I shall dispense with first—our Friend Ezekiel has been Killed in the course of a brave Action, about which I shall say more when I have gathered my Ability to relate any words at all. You have, I am certain, long been acquainted with the Vicious Events that took place during the Summer past on the Heights overseeing that most admirable of Cities, our fair Boston-Town. The entirety of Charles-Town, which lay close by the hot Action of the summer, has been extinguished by fire promoted by the Evil actions of the rebels who infest the Countryside all about there. A pitched Battle was there fought, with the loss of some hundreds of gallant Souls, among the which was my dear Ezekiel. Oh!  I cannot write anything Sensible, so lost am I in my Grief, but I shall try. The wicked Enemy (for Enemies they now be, to all decent Men of loyal hearts) made bold to attempt a Bombardment of the city of Boston, which was held firm under the Protection of the King’s Men who have long been encamped in that Place. Our Men gave them firm opposition in this Cruel Design, and the battle that resulted was as Terrible as any I have read about in any History. While I was not present, that Place being, as you know, pretty distant from our little Town, I have spoken to those who went there and Assisted to bury those who fell to our enemies’ treacherous Designs. One of the fallen was found to have in his Pocket a letter signed as Ezekiel Mills, and when I described that Dear Man to he who carried the precious Letter, he agreed that the cold corpse answered to Ezekiel’s description. I am unable to imagine my Fate without my friend and Protector, dear Susannah! I am overcome with the loss we have thereby suffered. In the end, as I am sure you have read in your news-papers, the Loyal forces of the King repulsed the cowardly attack of the accursed rebels, but such Victories we cannot afford very often, it is said far and wide. I cannot breathe, I am so consumed with grief, even with Ezekiel these many weeks in his cold Grave. There is not much else to tell that you will not have heard of elsewhere. We labor in the Desolation that is our world after this terrible Battle, and hope only that our Enemies may come to swift and complete Defeat and Ruin, as they have brought so many good Men to ruin. I hope that you are well, and that the Evil of war may not come to visit you at your Wise Remove from this place of Woe. I am,

Your sad but constant Friend,

Emma

 

The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker’s Hill, June 17, 1775, by John Trumbull (hover over image at link for individual tags of identification; names there are also hyperlinked for more information on each figure) via Wikimedia Commons

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Lars Hedbor is so graciously gifting a paperback copy to some lucky winner! And that person gets to choose which title! Simply comment below or at this link on our FB blog page—even a simple hello will get you into the drawing, which will take place December 12.

To see information on each book, click here.

You may also wish to have a peek at my previous reviews for Tales From a Revolution—

The Prize (Tales From a Revolution: Vermont)

The Light (Tales From a Revolution: New-Jersey)

The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

The Break (Tales From a Revolution: Nova-Scotia) (Coming December 9)

The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

The Darkness (Tales From a Revolution: Maine)

The Path (Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island)

Get your free e-copy of The Declaration!

About the author ….

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and will be a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

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You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Break may be purchased in paperback (signed copies available upon request), as Kindle, Nook, iBooks, Kobo or at Smashwords. (Paperbacks also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble links.)

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Keep an eye out in these pages for more from Lars Hedbor, including an upcoming giveaway of a signed and personalized paperback copy of a Hedbor novel of the reader’s choice, and my review of The Break.

Photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

Book Review: The Path (Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island) (Brand Spanking New Release)

Tales From a Revolution: Rhode-Island
The Path
by Lars D.H. Hedbor

Update: Drawing referenced below will be held December 16

(see link here)

Comment below or at Facebook link located here to get your name in the drawing!

While American awareness of the French role played in the Revolution that won us our freedom is generally high, few encounter an opportunity to meet up with individual stories from the French perspective. With The Path, eighth in Lars D. H. Hedbor’s Tales From a Revolution series, we encounter Yves de Bourganes as he sets out to earn his widowed mother some much-needed money—and a little adventure wouldn’t hurt.

Not unlike the manner in which he approaches The Wind, wherein we see post-division Florida from the Spaniard Gabriel’s point of view, Hedbor again widens the scope as the novel opens to the young Frenchman contemplating possible duty near American shores, trouncing the English and the prospect of his nation and the Americans as allies, after having fought bitterly only several years before.

To his mother, this would be no surprise; she well understands the fickle ways of war. Her greatest fear is with his station in such a distant theater, and the likelihood of seeing her child again. He shares her concern, but works to remain optimistic, soon after engaging in that time-tested military routine of “hurry up and wait.”

The transition between opening scenes, in which Yves breaks the news to his mother and later, camps out and then anchors in Brest, is well chosen and executed. Hedbor’s choice of allowing Yves’s home scenes to remain preliminary is spot on: while important to help round out the boy’s character and background, it wouldn’t have been necessary to tell or even show readers, including the young adult audience the novel is aimed at, a departing scene between a frightened mother and her son. They already know this will happen, and her dialogue and actions—

… she wiped [the tears] away angrily …

She gave him a grudging smile.

She fixed him with a piercing glare. “Mind that you do, Yves.”

She nodded crisply.

—reveal her character, humor and strength in a degree commensurate with her role in the narrative.

When his mother and all her sons share one last meal together and the next chapter opens with Yves already in camp, at table with his friend Luc, Hedbor again cannily utilizes food, once more playing a central role in the passage, to correlate the scenes. The boys’ conversation also focuses on food, a uniter of people as well as common concern onboard any ship. Their exchange is so smooth, natural and authentic one might be forgiven for wondering if Hedbor had transcribed a previous recording he’d gathered.

In Newport, Rhode Island, Yves comes into contact with a merchant, via their mutual equestrian interest, and a female slave, Amalie, under the horse seller’s charge. It is the Frenchman’s first personal encounter with the vile institution, and he has a difficult time letting the meeting pass. Soon, the path Yves has chosen, already entangled by his involvement in someone else’s war, becomes even less clear, and brings unexpected circumstance and choices into his life.

As has been his habit, Hedbor writes a superb tale, wonderfully examining events via the perspectives of ordinary people, those who most definitely preceded us, but whose voice is either buried deep in time or completely lost. While fictional, the novel paints absolutely realistic portraits of our counterparts, with words creating marvelous brushstrokes that capture the feel, nuance, attitudes, occupations, sights and scents—and so much more—of the day. The thrill of a dice game; rustle of dry, waist-high grass; the tidy streets of a town even after warfare and meeting with Quakers in the colony (linking us also to another Hedbor tale, The Light), as well as Natives in the area (a special link to The Smoke).

I also love reading Hedbor’s historical notes, and those in The Path were no exception. While not difficult to guess that Yves’s place in travel was based on Rochambeau’s journey with his Expedition Particulalière, codename for the French forces sent to take part in the American Revolution, I had no idea of journals kept by French military personnel. Therefore I knew not of their opinions, apart from that they must not have been very affectionate regarding the practice of slavery. It had existed in France’s overseas colonies by this time, but that didn’t mean anyone had to like it. Hedbor candidly portrays this attitude on the part of the French and Americans opposed to it, while judiciously shunning the ill-informed broad brush so prevalent today, an important consideration especially given the target audience.

The author generally is tasked with coördinating a fair amount of real-life and fictional colors, details, and this seems extra true in the case of The Path. Moreover, any narrative dealing with slavery walks a fine line in light of current hypersensitivity closely related to historical events being examined under the lens of contemporary values. This cliché is not articulated to insinuate that slavery enjoyed a 100% approval rating in eighteenth-century America, but rather that the tolerance level was not then what it is today (zero), and there still can be good qualities to find in people of the time. Hedbor is aware that no population is that one dimensional.

This also touches upon the appearance of an historical figure of the era, Moses Brown, of whom Hedbor also speaks in his notes. As I read them, it occurred to me how much historical and fiction “color coördination” was so skillfully brushed into his portrait, what with the added mixture of English and French speakers, Quaker business practices, and Brown’s involvement in a family-run slave trade.

Then the author dabs here, dabs there as he pieces together images, and recognition is our reward.

He got a faraway look in his eye, and added, “It may be, though, that history records the burning of the Gaspee, and the shot fired at Duddington as being the opening salvo of this revolution against England. People in Boston and Williamsburg were so alarmed at the prospect that they began coordinating their efforts against the Stamp Act and other Parliamentary actions across the colonies … and that led to the formation of the Continental Congress, and that to the Declaration of Independence and our present war against England.”

 An intricate, thoughtfully told tale, The Path bears witness to one man’s struggle to choose and then move forward within the results of his election. Of all Hedbor’s works, it is perhaps one of his most technically perfect, while at the same time sacrificing nothing in creative beauty. It contains mad fear, anger, sorrow, betrayal and terror. However, the resiliency of the human spirit battles all these elements, with the theme of sharing running throughout, paving the way to change in the newborn nation. The characters are drawn with sensitivity, and some brutal truth, based as they are on real people, whose suffering and victories would be degraded and affronted were we to tell their tale in a manner that suits us, rather than how they actually lived these events. Hedbor honors their lives with this magnificently told story.

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The Break – upcoming review and more from Lars Hedbor!

Keep an eye out in these pages for more from Lars Hedbor, including an upcoming giveaway of a signed and personalized paperback copy of any Hedbor novel of the reader’s choice, and my review of The Break. 

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In addition to the above-linked reviews, click here to see my review for The Prize, and here for The Darkness.

 

About the author …

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and will be a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

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You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook.  The Path will be released tomorrow, October 19 (or pre-order now).

For those in or close to Aloha, Oregon, come have some fun! Release party for The Path will be October 28, between 1:00 and 4:00 in the afternoon, at Jan’s Paperbacks

Photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

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An advance reader’s copy of The Path was furnished to the blogger in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The Darkness (Tales From a Revolution: Maine)

Tales From a Revolution: Maine
The Darkness
by Lars D.H. Hedbor

Update: Drawing referenced below will be held December 16

(see link here)

Comment below or at Facebook link located here to get your name in the drawing!

Note: Lars Hedbor will donate all proceeds for The Wind in the month of September to hurricane relief. Books are great for gifting, a weekend read or your favorite classroom. By purchasing in September, you will be positively touching the lives of those affected. Thank you so much!

In each young adult novel within his Tales From a Revolution series, Lars D. H. Hedbor focuses on a particular region, whose Revolution story is told from within the context of how the people there experienced the breakaway colonies’ fight for freedom. Each tale comes to us through the perspective of a local, in the case of The Darkness, George Williams, a teenager living on a small island off the coast of Maine.

Like Florida, a portion of whose story we see in The Wind, Maine isn’t one of the original thirteen colonies. Owing to geography and current events, the region acts as a bit of a buffer between Nova Scotia and Massachusetts, and the inhabitants are not unaffected by incidents farther south, such as the Boston Tea Party and Lexington and Concord. Shubael, George’s father, has pledged his family to the king’s side with the signing of a loyalty oath, but as the novel gets moving, Hedbor uses a rhythmic ebb and flow of dialogue to inform us that the man does, actually, have some rather firm sympathies for the rebels. Still, he would prefer to just live his life, as does George, whose excessive breaks and poor choices frustrate his father.

The author has a talent for creating characters apart from the standard mold; they are ordinary people, those so many of us long to read and know about, but they inhabit a wide range of society, as briefly spoken of in my review for The Smoke. In different ways, the choices they make render them extraordinary, and the roles they play in their time each aid in underwriting a chain of events that contribute to history as we now know it—or, as the case may be, don’t always know. Hedbor adds to his plots by setting episodes against the backdrop of documented historical and natural events, such as the war on Lake Champlain in The Prizeor a thrilling glimpse of General Washington in the time leading up to his crossing of the Delaware in The Light.

The author continues in this fashion with his inclusion of a Harvard-sponsored expedition to Maine to observe the solar eclipse of 1780. In fascinating detail drawn out by characters’ experiences, we also learn of a phenomenon that occurred on May 19 of the same year: a strange darkness that shrouded a wide area of land, upward to Portland and as far south as New Jersey, where Washington recorded the event in his diary. Later known as “New England Dark Day,” it was widely feared to portend the approach of Judgement Day.

George’s own observation of the occurrence is matched by that of the animals around him.

It was dark enough now that George could hear the birds in the trees at the edge of the field singing their evening songs, though they sounded confused and forlorn. The cattle were moving of their own volition to the barn, too, just as though it was the end of the day, and not close to noontime.

Perhaps more than any previous Hedbor novel I have read, The Darkness emphasizes the need as well as reward for our awareness of such events in the lives of our forebears, especially given these occurred at such a watershed moment. Moreover, many of us having ourselves recently experienced a solar eclipse—or at least witnessed the enthusiasm for it—speaks to the reality that our place and response to this natural phenomenon, indeed our understanding of it, has its roots in the culture that experienced it before us, as well as within the embryonic path of American science pursued by Dr. Williams of Harvard.


In a historically famous response to the darkness, Connecticut legislator Abraham Davenport replied: “I am against adjournment. The day of judgment is either approaching, or it is not. If it is not, there is no cause for an adjournment; if it is, I choose to be found doing my duty. I wish therefore that candles may be brought.” —New England Historical Society


George’s attention is drawn to this expedition as well as a rebel spy he first encounters as she pummels a British soldier attempting to assault her. Securing an apprenticeship in town enables George to meet up with Louise more often, and he slowly begins to realize that the network of rebels and their active sympathizers is wider than he once understood. He becomes more involved than he’d originally planned, partly through a growing love for Louise, as well as events linking all of them to the scientific investigation, a criminal act and the perverse justice and public relations meted out by British officials. However, circumstances conspire to separate the pair as the redcoats keep an eye on the expedition, wanting no part of further American rebelliousness.

Another talent in no short supply is the author’s ability to portion out just the right amount of information to facilitate the growth of his plot and character development. In The Darkness, Louise’s introduction might have been a bit more rounded out, to explain her attraction to the grungy and hapless George, other than his status as her would-be rescuer. Nevertheless, the pair work well together and Louise’s strength and will helps George to grow within his. Hedbor’s portrayal of the relationship George has with his two menacing older brothers is not only realistic, but often intensely relatable, especially to those readers who occupied the lowest rung in their respective families. Sibling cruelty, the author is well aware, often knows no bounds.

As always, Hedbor’s dialogue frequently contains within it messages passed, revealing the speaker’s positions, all while utilizing language beautifully suited to the era. The end result is a revelation that people are people and whether then or now, are subject to a wide range of emotions that, even when veiled, occasionally display a need to release. As George’s oldest brother, Lemual, speaks to a student setting up equipment in preparation for the eclipse study, the results of which have implications for the improvement of seafaring accuracy, he asks the young man about the importance of knowing the precise time.

“Because, on the day of the eclipse, we will then be able to determine with great precision when specific parts of the event take place. With that knowledge, and some rigorous and painstaking mathematical analysis, which the good professor will doubtlessly suggest one of us would profit from performing on his behalf, we can calculate precisely where within the moon’s shadow we stood when it crossed over our location.”

The dialogue also presents us with an opportunity to explore their perspective from their angles, as opposed to our own. Observing George silently examining

a marvelous mechanical clock, with hands that not only counted off the hours, but also the minutes and even the seconds[, o]ne of the students pointed out the pendulum that swung ponderously back and forth under the main workings of the clock and explained, “That’s made of two different medals, arrayed such that it will adjust itself for complete accuracy, even when the temperature changes. It’s an amazing advance in the precision of timekeeping, and we’re very fortunate to have this one.”

The novel’s conversations reveal Hedbor’s attention to the detail of language, not only pertaining to era but also relational makeup. Maine is within close proximity to Nova Scotia, from where thousands of French-speakers were expelled, less than two decades before, to the thirteen colonies. Therefore, when a Harvard student’s reply includes French nuance—“Understand that we are, of course, sensible of your position under the occupation of the Crown’s forces”—it is not out of the realm of possibility that his English might have been influenced by those Acadians who may have landed nearby, especially given his likely age. Linguistically, minority speakers do not generally have an enormous effect on the mainstream language, and Hedbor’s limited instances of such influence would be a statistically sound representation.

That the author’s inclusions of details large and small, within language and other angles, could engender such discussion, speaks to his dedication to research as well as accurate and genuine representation of the people he portrays. Readers can experience this in a variety of ways, such as within the tasks set out by Helen, George’s mother, purchases and availability of items and the running of a business. War is depicted, certainly, but people also had to continue with their lives during and after, and the rich detail Hedbor presents magnificently fills to the brim a 200-page book written in a manner amazingly suited to young adult as well as grown-up readers. Being able to attract a crossover audience and create intrigue and appeal within those readers is no small feat, but Hedbor pulls it off time and time again.

The Darkness is a worthy addition to Hedbor’s Tales From a Revolution series: it is an enthralling and absorbing story that captures reader imagination and brings to life the history we know a portion of and its people even less. Suitable for young adults (perhaps even a bit younger) and up, it also brings to us the richness of our ancestors’ lives and broadens the appeal of historical fiction and, indeed, the search for more real details of the lives of people who shaped who we are.

sensitive

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About the author ….

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and will be a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

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You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Darkness may be purchased in paperback (signed copies available upon request), as Kindle, Nook, iBooks, Kobo or at Smashwords. (Paperbacks also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble links.)

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Keep an eye out in these pages for more from Lars Hedbor, including an upcoming giveaway of a signed and personalized paperback copy of a Hedbor novel of the reader’s choice, and my review of The Path, the author’s latest novel, on sale October 19 (or pre-order now).

For those in or close to Aloha, Oregon, come have some fun! Release party for The Path will be October 28, between 1:00 and 4:00 in the afternoon, at Jan’s Paperbacks

Photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

A copy of The Darkness was furnished to the blogger in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: The Wind (Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida)

Note: Lars Hedbor will donate all proceeds for The Wind in the month of September 2017 to hurricane relief. Books are great for gifting, a weekend read or your favorite classroom. By purchasing in September, you will be positively touching the lives of those affected. Thank you so much!

Tales From a Revolution: West-Florida
The Wind
by Lars D.H. Hedbor

Click here for your free copy of The Declaration
(See below for upcoming author appearances)

The American Revolution being part of a larger world war is an idea that many people don’t touch upon, or disagree as to the accuracy of such an association. However, it remains true that many British saw our rebellion as part of French technique to run them down, and Spanish losses during the Seven Years’ War influenced their involvement against the British when the thirteen colonies declared their independence. Surely not forgetting the seizure of Havana, the Spaniards set themselves up to avoid a repeat, later aiming to re-take Florida, which had been divided by the British into east and west.

Thus it is in West Florida that Lars D.H. Hedbor sets The Wind, which opens with a dramatic hurricane scene that nevertheless has a feel of calm, as Gabriel falls from a noisy and chaotic sinking ship, into a quiet bliss, taking in the welcome stillness and warm water.

The whistling of the wind in the rigging, the desperate shouts of men struggling to make themselves heard over the storm, the crash of water against the sides of the ship, all were silenced. Gone, too, were the cracks and thuds of falling spars, the hoarse cries of surprise wrenched from the throats of men as they were swept from the decks, and the deep, muffled boom of the thunder.

 The passage has a peaceful effect on readers as well, and it is not difficult to imagine how someone might be lulled into the quiet arms of death by drowning. This introduces The Wind as perhaps the most intense and powerful installment in the Tales From a Revolution series I’ve read thus far, and that’s saying something, given Hedbor’s previously demonstrated and considerable skill in transporting readers to the moment, bringing events to vivid life and enabling an audience to see the era through the eyes of his characters, who are drawn with a deep understanding of the time and locales in which they live. Here the author goes one step further in portraying a Spaniard, as opposed to an American colonist, freshening up an already-lively series with a whole new, larger perspective.

The storm that washes Gabriel onto the shores where he meets Carlotta, preceded by Governor Galvez’s plan through covert operations to aid the American rebels, also brings a number of changes into the lives of the people in its midst. The bold plot is “swept aside now by the unpredictable power of the storm, a factor that [Gabriel] suspected was not doing as much harm to the plans of their enemies upriver.” As Gabriel recuperates in Carlotta’s ramshackle dwelling, she embarks on a search for her husband, Paulo.

As Hedbor moves his story along, his competency as a writer is easily apparent. Enabled by third-person narration, the author skillfully weaves in and out of Gabriel’s point of view and his observations of Carlotta’s emotional state. Shortly after awakening the subsequent morning, “[h]is expression formed the question that she answered with a slow, sad shake of her head.” Following a few words, she “punctuates her conclusion with a deep sigh” and after a quiet conversation, her shoulders shake “with the unrelenting sobs of the bereaved.” The intervening dialogue strikes a balance in their exchange, and the tale has established itself as readers eagerly anticipate learning the fate of Paulo as well as what Gabriel plans for his future.

As the narrative continues and Gabriel’s fate opens before him, Hedbor adds more plotlines, to include murder, siege, betrayal, shipboard battle—and a foray into magical realism. The protagonist feels obligations toward the villagers, but yearns for his sailing life as he strains to cope with the growing conflicts, personal and political.

“It is a matter of our honor and our duties as subjects of King Carlos of Bourbon, in Madrid … [h]e says to fight in his name, and we can do no other.”

 Still she scowled at Gabriel, answering, “The King is not living in a hut far from his real home, counting his blessings for every potato that some far-off benefactor deigns to send him …. You ask whether our progress here satisfies me, without ever asking me once whether the goal you work toward is anything that I want. Perhaps I was not interested in re-building these shacks, and waiting for the next storm to blow them into splinters.”

 That Hedbor so succinctly and brilliantly speaks from such a wide variety of perspectives, whether within one novel and the opposing ideals of two or more characters, or when examining his other works in which he presents stories from such a diverse sampling of colonists who lived over 200 years before—this is nothing short of awe inspiring. His dialogue and its attendant character gesticulations and facial movements, depicted or observed, the narrative that flows so smoothly, contains such a trove of experience and understanding; it moves with fluidity and grace, despite the great import of its prose and importance within. We take in an entire world with the expenditure of only a few words. This is carefully crafted art, consummate storytelling, and while Hedbor’s previous novels* are radiant, The Wind champions what people have been doing for thousands of years, and fulfills the inbuilt human yearning to be told a story.

As we move closer to the Spanish attempts to wrest back from the British what was taken and divided, we encounter yet more storms, the wind of which carries in what seems like certain fate (see derived hurricane tracks here). Galvez’s forces take their aim at the Siege of Pensacola, the portrayals of which are perhaps the most skillfully executed in the entire novel. Whether inevitable defeat etched out in the scenes sailors witness, anger, upswept optimism or the burden of silent losses, readers are carried on and feel each wave as the pages turn, sense the rise and fall of fortune like the ebb and flow of the sea, smell the salt air that inspires and the longing of separation.

That Gabriel becomes part of a tale for our ears and eyes might be gratifying for him, given that his role—fictional here, though representative of many whose journeys crossed the routes described herein—floundered for quite some time, away from the imagination of the American reader. His aim for a comeback quenches American taste for revivals, and in our quest along with him to attain it, we encounter a story so rich and thrilling, readers will wonder exactly why this account is not more widely known. Thanks to Lars Hedbor, it soon will be, on our own shores and elsewhere.


* Thus far The Prize, The Light and The Smoke.

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Lars D. H. Hedbor tells a little about himself and how his novels came to be…

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and will be a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

*********

You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Wind may be purchased in paperback (signed copies available upon request), as Kindle, Nook, iBooks, Kobo or at Smashwords. (Paperbacks also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble links.)

UPCOMING APPEARANCES

When: Sunday June 4 (1:30-5:00 p.m.): Wilsonville Festival of Arts
Where: 29600 SW Park Place, Wilsonville, OR
The annual Wilsonville Festival of Arts is the Wilsonville Arts & Culture Council signature event. Lars will be meeting with readers and signing books all afternoon.

When: Saturday June 24 (3:45- 5:15 p.m.)
Where: Hilton Portland, 921 SW 6th Avenue, Portland, OR
Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference Book SigningThe premiere event for historical fiction in North America, the 2017 HNS Conference is being held in Portland, Oregon. Meet Lars and get your books signed during the book sale at the conference!

When: Friday June 23 (10:30- 11:30 a.m.)
Where: Hilton Portland, 921 SW 6th Avenue, Portland, OR
HNS 2017 Imagining the American Revolutionary Era Panel
[Lars D.H. Hedbor, C.C. Humphreys, Laura Kamoie, Stephanie Dray; moderator: Matt Phillips]
Between Outlander, Turn, and Hamilton: The Musical, the American revolutionary era has gained renewed public interest and attention. Join authors established in this era in a discussion of trends and opportunities in American revolutionary fiction, research challenges and advantages, topics and figures ripe for fictionalized treatment, how to incorporate historical sites into your research and promotion, and more.

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Photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

A copy of The Wind was furnished to the blogger in exchange for an honest review.

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Update: A note was added to include information about author contributions from sales to hurricane relief.

Book Review: The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

The Smoke (Tales From a Revolution: New York)

by Lars D. H. Hedbor

smokeOne of the things I like best about Lars D.H. Hedbor’s novels is the rotating perspectives they take on: Revolutionary stories, which I have loved hearing since childhood from my father, told from points of view history generally skips over. In The Prize Caleb, a young boy growing up in Vermont, witnesses the birth of a new nation and he plays a significant role in the struggle his region encounters. Farther south in New Jersey, Quaker settlers in The Light have some hard choices to make as their pacifist ways run afoul of the king’s mounting pressure against the colonies. The author brings his tales at various times through victory and defeat, and his characters utilize their unique perspectives, cultural understandings and individual abilities the navigate their particular wartime settings, wherever they may be in the colonies.

In The Smoke Hedbor brings us to New York, where love, loss, struggle and occasional victory also play their roles, introducing readers to the indigenous Tuscarora, members of the larger Iroquois Confederation. Caught between their tribal loyalties and war between the Colonial and British armies, various bands and tribes ally themselves with the Americans. Having been forsaken by their British allies, who made promises in exchange for attacks on colonial homesteads, they split from their confederation as those who stayed loyal to the Redcoats ultimately relocated to Ontario, with the rest remaining in what was to be United States territory.

As the battles rage on, two Tuscarora tribal members observe colonial scouts, whose presence in the forest the Natives can easily detect, while they remain hidden from Washington’s soldiers. Early on Hedbor sets up a thrilling continuity via alternating viewpoints portraying to readers events from each group’s point of view in something akin to real time. Very quickly readers realize that while the Americans discuss their plans and try to conceal signs of their camp, the Tuscarora—one of whom understands English—are listening. An anxious moment comes when discovery is threatened, but the alternating viewpoint keeps the tension hovering while maintaining clarity within point of view.

This alternating viewpoint continues through the novel as we follow the colonials as well as Natives, particularly Joseph and Ginawo, both of whom are counseled by their respective leaders as to the nature of their perceived enemy.

“Are they so difficult to spot in these woods?”

 “They are like smoke, Joseph, and they have lived in these woods for many hundreds of years, at the least, so they have learned all the ways of keeping out of sight and covering their tracks. Those who dismiss them as primitive men or mere savages do so at their peril.”

 This passages hints at the title’s deeper significance, referencing not only the resulting smoke from villages burned in retaliation for attacks, but also the Natives themselves, so often able to hover within the forest like smoke, though impossible to capture with one’s hands. This, however, does not guarantee victory for the tribes, for the Americans also have their techniques, not entirely understood by their adversaries.

“[The elders] believe that the best way to ensure that our people can find peace is to understand these pale men …in order to learn how we can make peaceful terms with the Colonials.”

 Overall the Natives and Americans maintain an uneasy alliance, one group caught up in a war that is not theirs and attempting to figure out which is the better side to support, the other understanding that the land they occupy is too big for the British, whose people back home will ultimately tire of the fighting. The Natives instinctively recognize this, and worry what will become of their own people and settlements. The Algonquin wars with the French, in the elders’ youth, had destroyed a key Native tactical advantage. King Philip’s War, an earlier conflict in the region now known as New England, had also resulted in the unraveling of a larger Native alliance and birth of a distinct American identity separate from subjects of the king. Certainly aware of these and other events, the Tuscarora know the colonials are here to stay.

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Hedbor uses his linguistic experience to effect some of this uncertainty, crafting Native dialogue smoothly when they are meant to be speaking in their own language, with rougher edges to indicate English. However, he does more than employ mere grammatical errors, instead stripping away English conventions, such as tense, and reordering it within the structure of the Tuscaroran language. The outcome is a greater sense of tension between colonial and Native when they are exposed to one another, and a more at-ease sensation when Ginawo, Tanarou or others speak amongst themselves. In this manner Hedbor’s transitions into scenes of Native life occur organically and it becomes much easier to grasp similarities and not only differences. There are memories of attraction of male to female, small children laughing at the way Joseph speaks, words of grief, pleas for longer sleep and poking fun at each other with words like “turkey.”

While Hedbor presents his audience with a need to re-examine these Revolutionary events equipped with greater understanding of Native suffering, he wisely refrains from lecturing readers, while still engaging our rapt attention. First, he openly and honestly references retaliation for violence perpetrated against innocent colonials, but also maps out dissenting views within Native politics. The consequences of these, paired with Joseph’s own experience of living his American identity and exposure to indigenous culture causes him to question much that he knows, and Hedbor guides him—and us—through his new experiences within authentic scenes that contribute to his growth—and ours.

lightOne of my favorite elements of these scenes and Hedbor’s attention to detail is that in which medical attendance—“physicking”—is described in rich prose strokes easily creating images that come alive within the narrative. Hedbor also breaks free of the confines wherein the Native perspective is given the historical “Other” treatment, or else they are portrayed as perpetual victims. While this era in history was certainly not good to them and they suffered many wrongs, they make missteps of their own while simultaneously being strong people who gallantly stand to defend what they see as theirs. Hedbor allows his Native characters greater reign to define who they are themselves, and they turn out to be every bit as complicated and complex personalities as anyone else.

As historical fiction, The Smoke is top notch, and naturally overlaps into an attraction for those interested in the Revolution, or Native Americans, even British, French or Canadian history. It is a worthy and outstanding addition to this author’s growing collection of Revolutionary stories told from unique perspectives, and serves as a portend of even better yet to come. This seems to be part of the “verdict” after each Hedbor read, as it becomes more and more difficult to decide which one we like best.

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Lars D. H. Hedbor tells a little about himself and how his novels came to be…

What made the American Colonists turn their back on their King, and fight for independence? How were they different from us–and how were their hopes and fears familiar to our own hearts?

headshot-4_400x400These are the sorts of questions that I think are important to ask in examining the American Revolution, and in the pages of my novels, I suggest some possible answers.

My first novel, The Prize, was published in 2011, followed by The Light in 2013, and The Smoke, The Declaration, and The Break in 2014; The Wind was published in 2015, and The Darkness in 2016.

I’ve also written extensively about this era for the Journal of the American Revolution, and have appeared as a featured guest on an Emmy-nominated Discovery Network program, The American Revolution, which premiered nationally on the American Heroes Channel in late 2014. I am also a series expert on America: Fact vs. Fiction for Discovery Networks, and will be a panelist at the Historical Novel Society’s 2017 North American Conference.

I am an amateur historian, linguist, brewer, fiddler, astronomer and baker. Professionally, I am a technologist, marketer, writer and father. My love of history drives me to share the excitement of understanding the events of long ago, and how those events touch us still today.

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You can follow and learn more about Lars D.H. Hedbor and his books at his website and blog, Twitter and Facebook. The Smoke may be purchased in paperback (signed copies available upon request), as Kindle, Nook, iBookKobo or at Smashwords. (Paperbacks also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble links.) 

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Photo courtesy Lars D.H. Hedbor

A copy of The Smoke was furnished to the blogger in exchange for an honest review.

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This post has been updated to correctly include the novel’s complete title in link and blog header.