Guest Post: Kristie Dean: On the Trail of the Yorks (Plus Giveaway)

On the Trail of Richard IIIToday I’m very excited to host Kristie Dean, author of On the Trail of Richard III (formerly The World of Richard III), which I reviewed back in August. The paperback edition is being released today in the United States and is available for purchase at Amazon.

Now Dean is back with an accompanying text, On the Trail of the Yorks, which I’ll leave for her to introduce. However, I will add that you should be sure to leave a comment because there’s a free copy to be had! Simply leave a comment–don’t fret about saying anything super snazzy–and you’ll be entered into the draw! On the Trail of the Yorks is also available for purchase here.

On the Trail of the Yorks

Part of the fun of researching On the Trail of the Yorks was visiting the places the York family had lived and loved. I especially enjoyed visiting locations that had not experienced great changes because it felt as if I could almost reach out and touch the past. When Lisl invited me to do a guest blog, I decided to share some of my pictures from the research trip. Some of these made it into the book, while others did not.

Ludlow Castle has to be one of the more picturesque castles in the British Isles. The best views of the enormous building can be gained by meandering along the Bread Walk from Ludford Bridge. Towering over the river, Ludlow can be glimpsed from the path through a mixture of tangled vines and flowers. Richard, Duke of York, was here at the castle when news reached him that the king’s troops had arrived.

Ludlow Castle

From the first moment I visited Kenilworth Castle, I was enchanted.  The castle ruins glow red in the sun and it is easy to imagine how grand it once appeared as Richard approached it towards the end of his reign. ­­The garden in the castle is a recreation of a Tudor garden and is exquisite. A garden certainly existed at Kenilworth in Richard’s time as well.

Kenilworth Castle

Calais was an unexpected delight. I arrived early in the morning and made my way to the center of the city. After parking my rental car, I walked to Église de Notre Dame where George, Duke of Clarence, and Isabel Neville likely married. Unfortunately, it was closed for renovations, but I was able to make my way around the outside before walking on to the harbor. Calais was largely destroyed in the twentieth century and not much remains of the city as Richard and his brothers would have known it.

Calais
Église de Notre Dame

Bruges, Belgium is a place that I hope to return to time and again. Picturing Margaret, Duchess of Burgundy, as she rode in a lavish procession through the city following her marriage to Charles, was incredibly easy. The city center still retains its medieval feel and there is so much to offer a visitor interested in history. Of all the places that I visited for the first time on my research trip for On the Trail of Richard III, it was my favorite. Take a ride on the canal, wander the twisting, winding medieval streets, or climb to the top of the belfry for an amazing view.

Bruges

Anne Neville married Edward of Lancaster at the Château d’Amboise in France. I was doubly excited to visit the château since Anne Boleyn also stayed there for a time. The day I visited was a gorgeous sunny one, with the creamy white building shimmering against the backdrop of the sparkling blue sky. As I strolled through the gardens, I pictured a young Anne Neville doing the same as she contemplated her marriage to her family’s former enemy.

Chateau d'Amboise
Château d’Amboise

Cecily Neville is believed to have been born at Raby Castle. While little of the interior is the same as it was in her time, the exterior still resembles the castle Cecily knew. A visit to Raby Castle can take a few hours and the interior is accessible via a guided tour. On one of my visits I was lucky enough to see several of the deer that still roam Raby’s deer park. Although I have been several times, I always manage a visit to the parish church in Staindrop.

Raby

Ewelme, in Oxfordshire, was another delightful surprise. Elizabeth, the fifth child and second daughter of Cecily and Richard, married John de la Pole, the son of William de la Pole and Alice Chaucer. She and John would have visited Ewelme often, especially when Alice was still alive. Within the parish church of St. Mary the Virgin, a large alabaster tomb rests between the nave and the chapel of St. John the Baptist. This elaborately decorated tomb contains an effigy of Alice wearing a ducal coronet.

Ewelme

Eltham Palace was a favorite of Edward IV. He was responsible for the construction of the Great Hall. Today, the only way to visit the hall is by buying a ticket to tour the Art Deco palace. I thought I would rush through the palace and make my way immediately to the hall, but I thoroughly enjoyed the 1930s interior.

Eltham Palace
Eltham Palace

Lincoln Cathedral is a must-see for any visitor to England. The soaring cathedral was reputedly once the tallest building in the world. Not a single detail was overlooked in its construction and it is a beautiful place to visit. Nearby is the Medieval Bishops’ Palace where Richard likely stayed on his visit to the city. I also enjoyed visiting Gainsborough Old Hall, a short distance away. Richard was a guest here overnight.

screenshot

*********

Gainsborough Old Hall

About the author…

Kristie Dean is the author of On the Trail of Richard III (formerly The World of Richard III) and On the Trail of the Yorks, both available from Amberley Publishing. When not travelling for research, you can find her at home with her husband, three dogs and two cats.

Many, many thanks to Kristie Dean for stopping by for a visit and sharing her beautiful photos with us!

Remember to comment below to get your name in the drawing for a FREE COPY of On the Trail of the Yorks.

*********

My Tottering TBR: Currently on My Night Table

Today in my importing I skip ahead a bit to introduce a new series rolled out recently and share once more while it is still current. 

*********

I know you all love books so here is another new series for your perusal. “My Tottering TBR” today will show off a few works my eyes are currently roving–that is, have actually started and are actively reading. Other angles will pop up as the series goes along and I hope you enjoy the titles.

(Blurbs are provided with links to other interesting stuff. Hyperlinked titles indicate an author or book’s direct page; others lead to related sites but I will always ensure there is an author link there.)

The World of Richard III by Kristie Dean

world of richard iiiRichard III remains one of the most controversial rulers in history. Whether he was guilty of murdering his nephews or not is a mystery that perhaps will never be solved. Even the location of the battlefield where, on 22 August 1485, Richard was struck down, has been a matter of debate. This book leads you on a journey through the landscape of Richard’s lifetime.

Following Richard’s trail, you will visit resplendent castles, towering cathedrals, manor homes and chapels associated with Richard. The Middle Ages come alive again as you visit Tewkesbury Abbey, where Richard helped his brother secure his throne. Witness the stunning vista of Wensleydale as you visit Middleham Castle, Richard’s adopted childhood home. Each location is brought to life through engaging narrative and an extensive collection of photographs, floor plans and images.

Added note: This book has since been read. To access the review click here.

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

[Cover image to be replaced]

The year is 1945. Claire Randall, a former combat nurse, is just back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon as she walks through a standing stone in one of the ancient circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach–an “outlander”–in a Scotland torn by war and raiding border clans in the year of our Lord. . . 1743.

Hurled back in time by forces she cannot understand, Claire is catapulted into the intrigues of lairds and spies that may threaten her life, and shatter her heart. For here, James Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior, shows her a love so absolute that Claire becomes a woman torn between fidelity and desire–and between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives.

Sextant by David Barrie

[Cover image to be replaced]

In the tradition of Dava Sobel’s Longitude comes this dramatic tale of invention and discovery–an eloquent elegy to one of the most important navigational instruments ever created, and to the daring mariners who used it to explore, conquer and map the world.

Barrie takes readers straight to the helm of some of history’s most important expeditions, interweaving these heroic tales with the account of his own transatlantic passage as a young man. A heady mix of adventure, science, mathematics, and derring-do, Sextant is infused with a sense of wonder and discovery. At once a dramatic history of maritime endeavor and a love letter to the sea and sky, it is timeless storytelling at its best.

Liberty’s First Crisis: Adams, Jefferson, and the Misfits Who Saved Free Speech by Charles Slack

[Cover image to be replaced]

When the United States government passed the Bill of Rights in 1791, its uncompromising protection of speech and of the press were unlike anything the world had ever seen before. But by 1798, the once-dazzling young republic of the United States was on the verge of collapse: partisanship gripped the weak federal government, British seizures threatened American goods and men on the high seas, and war with France seemed imminent as its own democratic revolution deteriorated into terror. Suddenly, the First Amendment, which protected harsh commentary of the weak government, no longer seemed as practical. So that July, President John Adams and the Federalists in control of Congress passed an extreme piece of legislation that made criticism of the government and its leaders a crime punishable by heavy fines and jail time. In Liberty’s First Crisis, writer Charles Slack tells the story of the 1798 Sedition Act, the crucial moment when high ideals met real-world politics and the country’s future hung in the balance.

From a loudmouth in a bar to a firebrand politician to Benjamin Franklin’s own grandson, those victimized by the Sedition Act were as varied as the country’s citizenry. But Americans refused to let their freedoms be so easily dismissed: they penned fiery editorials, signed petitions and raised “liberty poles,” while Vice President Thomas Jefferson and James Madison drew up the infamous Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, arguing that the Federalist government had gone one step too far. Liberty’s First Crisis vividly unfolds these events in the early life of the republic, as the Founding Fathers struggled to define America off the page and preserve the freedoms they had fought so hard to create.

*********

I’d love to hear back from you on any of these or other titles you might recommend!

Note: This post recently appeared in the blog’s alternative location and has been updated since original publication to include a link to the review for The World of Richard III.

*********

Cover images courtesy their respective authors.

Book Review: The World of Richard III

The World of Richard III by Kristie Dean

world of richard iiiWith the recent re-internment and increased interest in Richard III, it is not surprising there would be a flurry of new publications related to the last Plantagenet king. While we all read at least a smattering of the Wars of the Roses (WoR), for many these studies belonged to bygone days, but the attention generated by these new books has brought the monarch to a wider audience. With The World of Richard III author Kristie Dean takes a new approach by bringing us to Richard. As closely as it is possible to do, she escorts us to and around the world he inhabited via the places he had visited, seeing or imagining what he observed and how he may have perceived it.

St. Mary's Church, Barnard Castle~A carving of Richard's emblem, the boar
St. Mary’s Church, Barnard Castle~A carving of Richard’s emblem, the boar

The work is a combination of travel information and history focused on places lived in or visited by Richard Plantagenet, from birth to his time as Gloucester, through his two years of kingship and finally, his death. Organized in seven major parts that span these courses of Richard’s life and in a loose chronological order, subsections then turn their attention to specific places associated with him on various occasions. As the author takes us from point to point there is some overlap, given that Richard visited certain locations several times, and Dean handles this seamlessly and without repetition. An extensive collection of beautiful photographs enables readers to follow along visually as they move forward.

Gatehouse at Middleham Castle~This is the entrance Richard would have used to reach the inner courtyard
Gatehouse at Middleham Castle~This is the entrance Richard would have used to reach the inner courtyard

The book is set up in a very practical manner, and the convenience will appeal to both armchair traveler as well as visitors to these amazing monuments. The table of contents lists the locations—including geographical—within each section in the event one wanted to access information about a specific site. While readers come in close contact throughout the book with the medieval practice of “recycling” names (first as well as surnames), Dean also provides a York family tree that sensibly and easily maps out the “who’s who,” helping to alleviate common confusions, for instance between Richard III (Gloucester) and his father, also called Richard (York). Years also are provided for clarification of events, such as the Duke of York and Salsbury’s flight to Ireland and Calais (1459), and their deaths in 1460, the latter of which is necessarily presented first.

A “how to” also briefly introduces the setup and points out helpful details such as contact information (phone as well as website), opening times, prices and postcode, which struck me not only as practical but also a blessing in disguise because many travelers—myself included—might get bogged down in their movements. In such instances it has happened that it doesn’t occur (to me and others) to check ahead about such additional details as cash machine availability, non-regular closures or waiting periods. Dean covers these and other crucial details and tips to contribute to a fascinating and rewarding journey.

The World of Richard III is presented in language that is a combination between necessarily practical and beautifully rhythmic, and Dean’s strength is being able to fuse the two in passages that complement each other. Ordinary words have the power to transfix, and the sense of peering through a veil is never far off. “But pause for a moment,” she advises at one point. “You are standing where he would have stood, with only the thin veil of time between you. It is a heady feeling.”

Church of St. Mary the Virgin and All Saints, Fotheringhay
Church of St. Mary the Virgin and All Saints, Fotheringhay

Dean speaks of Fotheringhay, Richard’s birthplace, in conjunction with how the “River Nene winds around the mound and disappears in the distance”; of the spires of St. Mary the Virgin and All Saints and a “sleepy river,” adding that “[d]uring Richard’s time, the river would have been humming with activity. On Richard and Edward’s visit in 1469 the view would have been one of constant commotion as people scurried about to meet the king.” As readers we are privileged to catch this glimpse of Richard re-visiting his roots and taking care of and pride in who he is.

Nottingham Castle~This was one of Richard's most visited castles, and where he and Anne learned the dreadful news of their son Edward's death.
Nottingham Castle~This was one of Richard’s most visited castles, and where he and Anne learned the dreadful news of their son Edward’s death.

The ideal of knowing who you are based on where you are is deeply embedded in the travelogue and Dean awards sense of place its rightful due by “illuminat[ing] his character through the places and events that shaped him into the man he became.” Indeed, many events prior to Richard contribute to place and shared history, and to this end the author also unpacks some of these events to give readers a greater sense of what it may have meant to Richard himself. She often invites readers to imagine Richard at a certain place, or to see something lovely or meaningful through his eyes, and it is not difficult to contemplate Richard as an individual rather than a noble, duke, monarch or distant historical figure. Speaking of the Painted Chamber, once the scene of a momentous occasion, Dean elaborates how

…the sun would cast a rosy glow through the four windows in the chamber, illuminating the decorative paintings that graced its interior. Even the arches over the windows were covered with paintings, mostly heraldic images. It is easy to imagine Richard pausing from his duties as king and admiring these magnificent works of art with their deep hues of vermillion, ochre, and verdigris.

Penrith Castle, Cumbria~Dean writes of the "sandstone glowing in the sun" and tells readers that "English Heritage credits him with adding large windows." It is easy to imagine how breathtaking the scenery would have been, from inside and out.
Penrith Castle, Cumbria~Dean writes of the “sandstone glowing in the sun” and tells readers
that “English Heritage credits him with adding large windows.” It is easy to
imagine how breathtaking the scenery would have been, from inside and out.

The author does not, however, romanticize Richard as someone he was not, and to that end she retains an extensive and admirable neutrality regarding his controversial life and opposing views as to what kind of person he was. Indeed more than once she references Lancastrians and Tudors within their humanity and expresses compassion regarding their losses. She does not seek to disparage and the questions raised about Richard pertaining to his nephews et al. are not addressed here.

For this reason, The World of Richard III is likely to appeal to admirers of any era, WoR, prior or subsequent to, as well as those unfamiliar with even key players or events of Richard’s time. Those mildly or deeply interested in the Middle Ages, castles, cathedrals, architecture, travel, monarchy, and where we come from all will find rewards within the pages of this book. It is a history and reads not unlike a story, accessible and fascinating, bringing to life not only details of past lives, but also portraits of individual people who lived and loved, and sometimes lost in a time they recorded, deliberately and not, in the places they lived. We are brought to these magnificent locations and shown their splendor within the framework of one life influenced by countless others. We follow the trail of Richard, whose memories might include much of what is presented here, and in so doing learn a great deal more about who we ourselves are.

Warwick Castle was an historic building even in Richard's day. Despite frequenting magnificent buildings, Dean writes, "Richard may still have been awed by the castle's grandeur."
Warwick Castle was an historic building even in Richard’s day. Despite frequenting magnificent buildings, Dean writes, “Richard may still have been awed by the castle’s grandeur.”

About the Author:
Kristie DeanKristie Dean has an MA in History and now enjoys teaching the subject, following a successful career in public relations. She has been published in several online magazines and local newspapers, and presented a paper at the International Congress on Medieval Studies. She lives in Tennessee, where she is currently working on her upcoming book, The World of the Yorks, which features locations associated with the York family.

You can find more about Dean and her work at her website, her Facebook page and that of The World of Richard III.

The World of Richard III by Kristie Dean is published by Amberley Publishing, 2015. It is available to buy at all good bookstores, as well as online at the Amberley website, Amazon, Amazon UK and the Book Depository.

*********

A copy of The World of Richard III was furnished to the blogger in exchange for an honest review. All images courtesy Kristie Dean.